Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Please choose a category:

Dress and Ceremonial

  1. Can I wear my Mess Dress after retiring/ releasing from the Canadian Armed Forces?
  2. Can I wear my uniform after retiring/releasing from the Canadian Forces?
  3. Do regulations authorize the buying of wreaths for Remembrance Day or other official commemorative ceremonies at public expense?
  4. How do I acquire a copy of an official Canadian Forces badge (graphics)?
  5. In a flag party, can foreign flags be carried by CAF members?
  6. Is the use of logos permitted in the CAF? If so, what are the rules governing the production and display of a logo?
  7. What are the rules associated with flag protocol/etiquette?
  8. What constitutes the Canadian Forces?
  9. What is the process for the naming of a work, building and geographical feature?
  10. What is the process to have an official Canadian Forces badge produced?
  11. When does a parade have to be conducted in bilingual format?
  12. When they play the national anthem at a parade should I sing?
  13. While in the US, I was given my US jump wings. Can I wear foreign specialist skill badges on my uniform?
  14. Who is entitled to an official Canadian Forces badge?

Question

What are the rules associated with flag protocol/etiquette?

Answer

In accordance with Chapter 4 of 'CFP 200 – The Heritage Structure of the Canadian Forces', flags, less consecrated Colours, shall always be flown in order of precedence for Canadian flags, that is; the National Flag; the Canadian Forces (CF) Ensign; command flags; field formation flags; branch flags and unit flags.

Other precedence rules are given for flags on vessels, in Chapter 4, Section 3; for personal and distinguishing flags/pennants, in Chapter 14; and for CF flags in the same class (e.g., branch flags) flown together, in Chapter 1.


Flag protocol dictates that the senior and junior positions for flags flown in order of precedence be as illustrated in Figure 4-2-1. The protocol on land visualizes flags as if they are being carried by individuals and being approached from the front, with the flag-bearer’s right taking precedence over the left, thus:


When two, or more than three, flags are flown together, the senior flag (the National Flag, if one of the group) shall be displayed on the right, that is, on the left side as seen by a spectator facing the dais, rostrum, saluting base, building, etc., from the front.


When three flags are flown together, the senior flag shall occupy the central position, with the next ranking flag on its right and the third ranking flag on its left, that is, on the left and right as seen by a spectator facing the flags from the front.


The rules for flying the National Flag are set by the Department of Canadian Heritage.