Volume 3, Part 1: Armour, Artillery and Field Engineer Regiments - ARMOUR REGIMENTS

THE BRITISH COLUMBIA REGIMENT (DUKE OF CONNAUGHT'S OWN)

The British Columbia Regiment (Duke of Connaught's Own) Badge

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BADGE

Description

On a maple leaf Vert resting upon a scroll Argent inscribed FRANCE FLANDERS 1915-18, two scrolls conjoined in pale Or inscribed BRITISH COLUMBIA, all above a bugle horn Argent and within a wreath of laurel Vert ensigned by the coronet of a younger son of the Sovereign proper, environed with a battle honour scroll Argent inscribed dexter VIMY 1917, SOMME 1916, FESTUBERT 1915, HINDENBURG LINE and sinister AMIENS, CANAL DU NORD, PASSCHENDAELE, DROCOURT-QUÉANT, the wreath surmounted below the coronet by two battle scrolls conjoined in pale Argent and inscribed SOUTH AFRICA 1899-1900 and YPRES 1915-17 and in base by a scroll Argent inscribed DUKE OF CONNAUGHT'S OWN RIFLES, all inscriptions in letters Sable.

Symbolism

The coronet of His Royal Highness Prince Arthur represents the tie between the Duke of Connaught and the original regiment. The maple leaf and scrolls represent the perpetuation of the 7th Canadian Infantry Battalion, CEF. The bugle, laurel wreath and the inscription "DUKE OF CONNAUGHT'S OWN RIFLES" reflect the unit's role as a rifle regiment from 1900 to 1920 and from 1930 to 1946. The battle honours represent the honours awarded to the regiment and its perpetuated units.

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MOTTO

FAUGH A BALLAGH (Clear the way)

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MARCHES

I'm Ninety Five

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ALLIANCE

British Army

The Royal Green Jackets

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AFFILIATION

HMCS Vancouver

BATTLE HONOURS

South African War

SOUTH AFRICA, 1899-1900.

The First World War

YPRES, 1915, '17; Gravenstafel; St. Julien; FESTUBERT, 1915; MOUNT SORREL; SOMME, 1916, '18; Flers-Courcelette; Thiepval; Ancre Heights; Ancre 1916; ARRAS, 1917, '18; Vimy, 1917; Arleux; HILL 70; Passchendaele; AMIENS; Scarpe, 1917, '18; Drocourt-Quéant; HINDENBURG LINE; Canal du Nord; Cambrai 1918; VALENCIENNES; FRANCE AND FLANDERS, 1915-18.

The Second World War

FALAISE; Falaise Road; The Laison; Chambois; THE SCHELDT; The Lower Maas; THE RHINELAND; The Hochwald; Veen; Twente Canal; Küsten Canal; Bad Zwischenahn; NORTH-WEST EUROPE, 1944-1945.

Note:

The British Columbia Regiment (Duke of Connaught's Own) possessed the battle honour PURSUIT TO MONS from the First World War, but this honour cannot be perpetuated if a regiment is entitled to the honour VALENCIENNES or SAMBRE. One of these honours was gained by the regiment upon amalgamation with The Irish Fusiliers of Canada (The Vancouver Regiment).

LINEAGE

This Reserve Force regiment originated on 12 October 1883 and incorporates the following regiments and artillery battery.

The British Columbia Regiment (Duke of Connaught's Own) originated in Victoria, British Columbia on 12 October 1883, when the 'British Columbia Provisional Regiment of Garrison Artillery' was authorized to be formed.1 It was redesignated: 'British Columbia Brigade of Garrison Artillery' on 7 May 1886;2 'British Columbia Battalion of Garrison Artillery' on 1 January 1893;3 '5th British Columbia Battalion of Garrison Artillery' on 1 January 1895;4 and '5th "British Columbia" Regiment, CA' on 28 December 1895.5 The regiment was reorganized into two battalions on 1 July 1896, designated the '1st' (now the '5th (British Columbia) Field Artillery Regiment, RCA') and '2nd' battalions.6 The '2nd Battalion' was detached and converted to infantry and redesignated the '6th Battalion Rifles' on 1 August 1899, with headquarters in Vancouver.7 It was redesignated the '6th Regiment "The Duke of Connaught's Own Rifles"' on 1 May 1900.8 On 12 March 1920, it was amalgamated with the '104th Regiment (Westminster Fusiliers of Canada)' (now 'The Royal Westminster Regiment') and redesignated the '1st British Columbia Regiment'.9 It was redesignated the '1st British Columbia Regiment (Duke of Connaught's Own)' on 1 November 1920.10 On 15 May 1924 it was reorganized into three separate regiments, designated: 'The Vancouver Regiment' (see below); 'The Westminster Regiment'; and the '1st British Columbia Regiment (Duke of Connaught's Own)'.11 The last named was redesignated: 'The British Columbia Regiment (Duke of Connaught's Own Rifles)' on 15 January 1930;12 and '2nd (Reserve) Battalion, The British Columbia Regiment, (Duke of Connaught's Own Rifles)' on 7 November 1940.13 The regiment was converted to armour and redesignated: '13th Armoured Regiment (The British Columbia Regiment), RCAC' on 1 April 1946;14 'The British Columbia Regiment (Duke of Connaught's Own) (13th Armoured Regiment)' on 4 February 1949;15 'The British Columbia Regiment (Duke of Connaught's Own) (RCAC)' on 19 May 1958;16 and 'The British Columbia Regiment (Duke of Connaught's Own)' on 7 October 1985.17 On 13 June 2002, it was amalgamated with 'The Irish Fusiliers of Canada (The Vancouver Regiment) (see below), retaining the same designation.18

Notes :

Unlike the volunteer militia units of Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, who were required to re-enrol under the Act 31 Vic.; Cap. 40, respecting the Militia Defence of the Dominion of Canada, the provinces which joined Confederation after 1867 were not covered by this provision. Therefore, there can be no legal continuity of a former British Columbia regiment - or ante-dating of authorization.

Upon redesignation as the 1st British Columbia Regiment on 12 March 1920 (see above), it was organized as a six battalion regiment with the 1st Battalion (7th Battalion, CEF), 2nd Battalion (29th Battalion, CEF) and 3rd Battalion (7th Battalion, CEF) on the Non Permanent Active Militia order of battle and the 4th Battalion (62nd Battalion, CEF), 5th Battalion (131st Battalion, CEF), and 6th Battalion (158th Battalion, CEF) on the Reserve order of battle. The designation of the 5th Battalion was changed to '5th Battalion (158th Battalion, CEF)' and the 6th Battalion to '6th Battalion (131st Battalion, CEF)' on 1 September 1921 (GO 246/21).

The 1st British Columbia Regiment was disbanded for the purpose of reorganization on 15 September 1920 and reorganized the same day (GO 232/20). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment

Upon reorganization on 15 May 1924 (see above), it was organized as a two battalion regiment with the 1st Battalion (7th Battalion, CEF) on the Non Permanent Active Militia order of battle and the 2nd Battalion (62nd Battalion, CEF) on the Reserve order of battle. The reserve unit was disbanded on 14 December 1936 (GO 3/37).

The Irish Fusiliers of Canada (Vancouver Regiment) originated in Vancouver, British Columbia on 15 August 1913, when the '11th Regiment Irish Fusiliers of Canada' was authorized to be formed.19 It was redesignated 'The Irish Fusiliers of Canada' on 12 March 1920.20 On 1 June 1936, it was amalgamated with 'The Vancouver Regiment' (see below) and redesignated the 'Irish Fusiliers (Vancouver Regiment)'.21 It was redesignated: '2nd (Reserve) Battalion, Irish Fusiliers (Vancouver Regiment)' on 1 January 1941;22 and 'Irish Fusiliers (Vancouver Regiment)' on 1 June 1945.23 The regiment was converted to artillery and redesignated the '65th Light Anti-Aircraft Regiment (Irish Fusiliers), RCA' on 1 April 1946.24 On 1 September 1958, it was amalgamated with the '120th Independent Field Battery, RCA' (see below), converted to infantry and redesignated the 'Irish Fusiliers of Canada (The Vancouver Regiment)'.25 It was reduced to nil strength and transferred to the Supplementary Order of Battle on 19 March 1965.26 On 13 June 2002, it was removed from the Supplementary Order of Battle and amalgamated with The British Columbia Regiment (Duke of Connaught's Own), as above.

Notes :

Upon redesignation as The Irish Fusiliers of Canada on 12 March 1920 (see above), it was organized as a two battalion regiment with the 1st Battalion (121st Battalion, CEF) on the Non Permanent Active Militia order of battle and a 2nd Battalion (no CEF designation) on the Reserve order of battle. The reserve unit was disbanded on 14 December 1936 (GO 3/37).

The Irish Fusiliers of Canada were disbanded for the purpose of reorganization on 2 July 1920 and reorganized the same day (GO 140/20). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment.

The Irish Fusiliers of Canada were disbanded for the purpose of amalgamation on 31 May 1936 and reorganized the next day (GO 43/36 and GO 55/36). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment.

The 120th Independent Field Battery, RCA originated in Prince Rupert, British Columbia on 1 May 1914, when the 'Earl Grey's Own Rifles' were authorized to be formed.27 It was redesignated: '68th Regiment (Earl Grey's Own Rifles)' on 2 November 1914;28 and 'The North British Columbia Regiment' on 12 March 1920.29 On 15 December 1936, it was converted to artillery and redesignated: '102nd (North British Columbia) Heavy Battery, RCA';30 '102nd (Reserve) (North British Columbia) Heavy Battery, RCA' on 1 January 1941;31 '120th Coast Battery, RCA' on 1 April 1946;32 '120th Heavy Anti Aircraft Battery, RCA' on 5 February 1948;33 '120th Harbour Defence Troop, RCA' on 17 October 1954;34 and '120th Independent Field Battery, RCA' on 25 October 1956.35 On 1 September 1958, it was amalgamated with the '65th Light Anti-Aircraft Regiment (Irish Fusiliers), RCA', as above.

Notes :

Upon redesignation as The North British Columbia Regiment on 12 March 1920 (see above), it was organized as a two battalion regiment with the 1st Battalion (102nd Battalion, CEF) on the Non Permanent Active Militia order of battle and the 2nd Battalion (30th Battalion, CEF) on the Reserve order of battle. The reserve unit was disbanded on 14 December 1936 (GO 3/37).

The North British Columbia Regiment was disbanded for the purpose of reorganization on 15 July 1921 and reorganized the same day (GO 257/21). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment.

The North British Columbia Regiment was disbanded for the purpose of reorganization on 14 December 1936 and reorganized the next day (GO 193/36). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment

The Vancouver Regiment originated in Vancouver, British Columbia on 15 May 1924 when the '1st British Columbia Regiment (Duke of Connaught's Own)' was reorganized into three separate regiments designated the '1st British Columbia Regiment (Duke of Connaught's Own)', 'The Westminster Regiment'; and 'The Vancouver Regiment'.36 On 1 June 1936, it was amalgamated with 'The Irish Fusiliers of Canada', as above.

Notes :

Upon redesignation as The Vancouver Regiment on 15 May 1924 (see above), it was organized as a two battalion regiment with the 1st Battalion (29th Battalion, CEF) on the Non Permanent Active Militia order of battle and the 2nd Battalion (158th Battalion, CEF) on the Reserve order of battle. The reserve unit was disbanded on 14 December 1936 (GO 3/37).

The Vancouver Regiment was disbanded for the purpose of amalgamation on 31 May 1936 and reorganized the next day (GO 43/36 and GO 55/36). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment.

Perpetuations

'7th', '29th', '30th', '62nd', '102nd', '121st', and '158th "Overseas" Battalion(s), CEF »

Headquarters Location

Vancouver, British Columbia

OPERATIONAL HISTORY

South African War

The 6th Battalion Rifles contributed volunteers for the Canadian Contingents during the South African War.37

The First World War

The 6th Regiment "The Duke of Connaught's Own Rifles" was placed on active service on 6 August 1914 for local protection duties.38

The 11th Regiment Irish Fusiliers of Canada was placed on active service on 6 August 1914 for local protection duties.39

The 7th Battalion, which was authorized on 10 August 1914 as the '7th Battalion, CEF',40 embarked for Britain on 28 September 1914.41 It disembarked in France on 15 February 1915, where it fought as part of the 2nd Infantry Brigade, 1st Canadian Division in France and Flanders until the end of the war.42 The battalion was disbanded on 30 August 1920.43

The 29th Battalion, which was authorized on 7 November 1914 as the '29th Battalion, CEF',44 embarked for Britain on 20 May 1915.45 It disembarked in France on 17 September 1915, where it fought as part of the 6th Infantry Brigade, 2nd Canadian Division in France and Flanders until the end of the war.46 The battalion was disbanded on 30 August 1920.47

The 30th Battalion, which was authorized on 27 October 1914 as the '30th Battalion, CEF',48 embarked for Britain on 23 February 1915.49 It was redesignated the '30th Reserve Battalion, CEF' on 18 April 1915 to provide reinforcements for the Canadian Corps in the field.50 On 4 January 1917 its personnel were absorbed by the '1st Reserve Battalion, CEF'.51 The battalion was disbanded on 1 September 1917.52

The 62nd Battalion, which was authorized on 20 April 1915 as the '62nd "Overseas" Battalion, CEF',53 embarked for Britain on 20 March 1916.54 It provided reinforcements for the Canadian Corps in the field until 6 July 1916 when its personnel were absorbed by the '30th Reserve Battalion, CEF'.55 The battalion was disbanded on 8 December 1917.56

The 102nd Battalion, which was authorized on 22 December 1915 as the '102nd "Overseas" Battalion, CEF',57 embarked for Britain on 18 June 1916.58 It disembarked in France on 12 August 1916, where it fought as part of the 11th Infantry Brigade, 4th Canadian Division in France and Flanders until the end of the war.59 The battalion was disbanded on 30 August 1920.60

The 121st Battalion, which was authorized on 22 December 1915 as the '121st "Overseas" Battalion, CEF',61 embarked for Britain on 14 November 1916.62 It provided reinforcements for the Canadian Corps in the field until 10 January 1917 when its personnel were absorbed by the '16th Reserve Battalion, CEF'.63 The battalion was disbanded on 17 July 1917.64

The 158th Battalion, which was authorized on 22 December 1915 as the '158th "Overseas" Battalion, CEF',65 embarked for Britain on 14 November 1916.66 It provided reinforcements for the Canadian Corps in the field until 4 January 1917 when its personnel were absorbed by the '1st Reserve Battalion, CEF'.67 The battalion was disbanded on 27 July 1917.68

The Second World War

The British Columbia Regiment was called out on service on 26 August 1939.69 Details of the regiment were placed on active service on 1 September 1939, under the designation 'The British Columbia Regiment (Duke of Connaught?s Own Rifles), CASF (Details)', for local protection duties.70 The details called out on active service were disbanded on 31 December 1940.71 The regiment subsequently mobilized 'The British Columbia Regiment (Duke of Connaught?s Own Rifles), CASF' for active service on 24 May 1940.72 It was redesignated: '1st Battalion, The British Columbia Regiment (Duke of Connaught?s Own Rifles), CASF' on 7 November 1940.73 It was converted to armour and redesignated: '28th Armoured Regiment (The British Columbia Regiment), CAC, CASF' on 26 January 1942;74 and '28th Armoured Regiment (The British Columbia Regiment), RCAC, CASF' on 2 August 1945.75 On 21 August 1942 it embarked for Britain.76 The regiment landed in France on 28 July 1944 as part of the 4th Armoured Brigade, 4th Canadian Armoured Division and continued to serve in North West Europe until the end of the war.77 The overseas regiment was disbanded on 15 February 1946.78

Details from the Irish Fusiliers were called out on service on 26 August 1939 and then placed on active service on 1 September 1939, under the designation 'Irish Fusiliers (Vancouver Regiment), CASF (Details)', for local protection duties.79 The details called out on active service were disbanded on 31 December 1940.80 The regiment subsequently mobilized the '1st Battalion, Irish Fusiliers (Vancouver Regiment), CASF' on 1 January 1941.81 This unit served in Canada in a home defence role as part of the 18th Infantry Brigade, 6th Canadian Division;82 and in Jamaica on garrison duty from 18 May 1943 to 6 August 1944.83 On 10 January 1945 it embarked for Britain,84 where it was disbanded on 19 January 1945 to provide reinforcements to the Canadian Army in the field.85 The regiment also mobilized the '3rd Battalion, Irish Fusiliers (Vancouver Regiment), CASF' for active service on 12 May 1942.86 This unit served in Canada in a home defence role as part of the 19th Infantry Brigade of Pacific Command.87 The 3rd Battalion was disbanded on 15 August 1943.88

The 102nd Battery was called out on service on 26 August 1939.89 Details of the battery were placed on active service on 1 September 1939, under the designation '102nd (North British Columbia) Heavy Battery, RCA, CASF (Details)', for local protection duties.90 The details called out on active service were disbanded on 31 December 1940.91 The battery subsequently mobilized the '102nd (North British Columbia) Heavy Battery, RCA, CASF' for active service on 1 January 1941.92 It was redesignated the '102nd Coast Battery, RCA, CASF' on 1 May 1942.93 This unit served in Canada in a home defence role with the '17th (North British Columbia) Coast Regiment, RCA, CASF' as part of Pacific Command.94 The battery was disbanded on 31 October 1945.95

GUIDON

The British Columbia Regiment (Duke of Connaught's Own)

CAMP FLAG

The British Columbia Regiment (Duke of Connaught's Own)


1. MGO 22/83. Formed from two existing independent garrison batteries and one rifle company authorized on the following dates: 'No. 1 Battery' at New Westminster (Seymour Battery of Garrison Artillery, 11 July 1874), 'No. 2 Battery' at Victoria (half of the Victoria Battery of Garrison Artillery, 19 July 1878), 'No. 3 Battery' at Victoria (half of the Victoria Battery of Garrison Artillery, 19 July 1878), and 'No. 4 Battery' at Victoria (No. 1 Company of Rifles, Victoria, 13 February 1874) / Formé de deux batteries de garnison indépendantes et d?une compagnie de voltigeurs autorisée selon les dates suivantes : « No. 1 Battery » à New Westminster (Seymour Battery of Garrison Artillery, 11 juillet 1874), « No. 2 Battery » à Victoria (la moitié de la Victoria Battery of Garrison Artillery, 19 juillet 1878), « No. 3 Battery » à Victoria (la moitié de la Victoria Battery of Garrison Artillery, 19 juillet 1878), et « No. 4 Battery » à Victoria (No. 1 Company of Rifles, Victoria, 13 février 1874).

2. MGO 9/86.

3. No authority for a change of designation of artillery brigades in 1892 is contained within the applicable Militia General Orders or Annual Militia Report sessional papers. However, the date of 1 January 1893 is consistent with the nomenclature used in the aforementioned sources of 1893 and the Department of Militia and Defence, The Militia List of the Dominion of Canada, 1893. (GO 21/93 - Establishment Lists of the Active Militia of the Dominion of Canada for the Financial Year 1893-94) / Les Ordres Généraux de la Milice ou les textes de séances du rapport Annuel de la Milice, ne comportent aucune autorité quant au changement d'appellation des brigades d'artillerie en 1892. La date du 1er janvier 1893 correspond toutefois à la nomenclature utilisée dans les sources de 1893 mentionnées précédemment ainsi que par le Ministère de la Milice et de la défense, The Militia List of the Dominion of Canada, 1893. (GO 21/93 - Establishment Lists of the Active Militia of the Dominion of Canada for the Financial Year 1893-94).

4. MGO 9/95; and/et The Militia List of the Dominion of Canada corrected to 1st January 1895.

5. MGO 58/95.

6. GO 69/96.

7. GO 83/99; and/et MGO 144/99.

8. GO 38/1900.

9. MO 61/20.

10. GO 189/20.

11. GO 66/24.

12. GO 13/30.

13. GO 273/40; and/et GO 42/41.

14. GO 115/46.

15. CAO 76-3, Supp Issue No. 114/49..

16. CAO 76-3, Pt 'B', Supp Issue No. 602/58.

17. MOO 351/85, 7 Oct 85 / DMO 351/85, 7 oct 85.

18. MOO 2002001, 13 Jun 02 / DMO 2002001, 13 juin 02.

19. GO 137/13.

20. MO 61/20.

21. GO 43/36; and/et GO 55/36.

22. GO 273/40; and GO 42/41.

23. GO 264/45.

24. GO 115/46.

25. CAO 76-3, Pt 'B', Supp Issue No. 602/58.

26. SD 1 Letter 64/53; and/et Letter, HQ Western Command to D Org, 18 Oct 65 File ref: WC 2001-3/1 (G).

27. GO 23/14; and/et GO 80a/14. Formed from an independent company of rifles at Prince Rupert designated the 'Earl Grey's Own Rifles' (authorized on 1 April 1910) and three newly authorized companies / Formé d'une compagnie indépendante de voltigeurs autorisée le 1er avril 1910, et baptisée le « Earl Grey's Rifles », et trois compagnies nouvellement autorisées.

28. GO 179/14.

29. MO 61/20.

30. GO 193/36.

31. GO 273/40; and/et GO 42/41.

32. GO 115/46.

33. CAO 76-3, Supp Issue No. 62/48.

34. CAO 76-3, Pt 'B', Supp Issue No. 415/54.

35. CAO 76-3, Pt 'B', Supp Issue No. 528/57.

36. GO 66/24.

37. GO 60/33.

38. GO 130/14.

39. Ibid.

40. PC 2067, 6 August 1914, and/et memorandum Preliminary Instructions for Mobn. War 1914, BGen V.A.S. Williams, Adjutant-General, Canadian Militia to O.Cs. Divisions and Districts, 10 August 1914, reprinted in Colonel A.F. Duguid, Official History of the Canadian Forces in the Great War, 1914-1919, vol. 1 - Appendices (Ottawa, 1938), pp. 37-39.

41. Ibid, pp. 110 and/et 116.

42. War Diary, 7th Battalion, 15 February 1915/15 février 1915, NAC/AN, RG/GE 9, Series 111-D-3, Vol. 4917, File/dossier 365; and/et G.W.L. Nicholson, Official History of the Canadian Army in the First World War, Canadian Expeditionary Force 1914-1919, (Ottawa, 1962), passim.

43. GO 149/20.

44. GO 36/15.

45. CEF Sailing List, vol. II.

46. War Diary, 29th Battalion, 17 September 1915/17 septembre 1915, NAC/AN, RG/GE 9, Series 111-D-3, Vol. 4936, File/dossier 427; and/et G.W.L. Nicholson, Official History of the Canadian Army in the First World War, Canadian Expeditionary Force 1914-1919, (Ottawa, 1962), passim.

47. GO 149/20.

48. Colonel A.F. Duguid, Official History of the Canadian Forces in the Great War, 1914-1919, vol. 1 (Ottawa, 1938), p. 368; Circular letter, Mobilization - 2nd Canadian Division, Lt Col R.J. Gwynne for Acting Adjutant-General to Districts, 26 December 1914, reprinted in vol. 1 - Appendices, pp. 345-346; and/et Ibid, p. 425.

49. CEF Sailing List, vol. II.

50. Shorncliffe Camp Order 354/15.

51. CRO 198/17; and/et War Diary, 1st Reserve Battalion, 4 January 1917/4 janvier 1917, NAC/AN, RG/GE 9, Series 111-D-3, Vol. 4950, File 475.

52. GO 82/18.

53. GO 103a/15.

54. CEF Sailing List, vol. IV.

55. Edwin Pye Papers, Summary of History of C.E.F. Units - 62nd Battalion, Document Collection/Collection de documents 74/672, Series/séries IV, Box/boîte 12, Folder/chemise 62.

56. GO 82/18.

57. GO 151/15.

58. CEF Sailing List, vol. VI.

59. War Diary, 102nd Battalion, 12 August 1916/12 août 1916, NAC/AN, RG/GE 9, Series 111-D-3, Vol. 4944, File/dossier 456; and/et G.W.L. Nicholson, Official History of the Canadian Army in the First World War, Canadian Expeditionary Force 1914-1919, (Ottawa, 1962), passim.

60. GO 149/20.

61. GO 151/15.

62. CEF Sailing List, vol. VII.

63. CRO 212/17.

64. GO 82/18.

65. GO 151/15.

66. CEF Sailing List, vol. VIII.

67. CRO 198/17; and/et War Diary, 1st Reserve Battalion, 4 January 1917/4 janvier 1917, NAC/AN, RG/GE 9, Series 111-D-3, Vol. 4950, File 475.

68. GO 89/17.

69. GO 124/39.

70. GO 135/39.

71. GO 44/41.

72. GO 184/40; and/et GO 50/41.

73. GO 42/41.

74. GO 132/42.

75. GO 275/45. The Canadian Armoured Corps was redesignated 'Royal Canadian Armoured Corps' on this date / Le « Canadian Armoured Corps » fut rebaptisé « Royal Canadian Armoured Corps » à cette date.

76. Douglas E. Harker, The Dukes, The Story of the Men Who Have Served in Peace and War with The British Columbia Regiment (DCO), (unpublished), p. 306.

77. John Marteinson and Michael R. McNorgan, The Royal Canadian Armoured Corps, (Toronto, 2000), p. 258.

78. GO 111/46.

79. GO 124/39; and/et GO 135/39.

80. GO 44/41.

81. GO 44/41; and/et GO 42/41.

82. Colonel C.P. Stacey, Official History of the Canadian Army in the Second World War, Volume 1, Six Years of War (Ottawa, 1955), p. 538.

83. War Diary, 1st Battalion, Irish Fusiliers (Vancouver Regiment), 18 May-4 August 1943/18 mai-4 août 1943, NAC/AN, RG24/GE 24, Series C-3, Vol. 15081.

84. Document Collection/Collection de documents 92/252, folder/chemise 29, file/dossier 1.

86. GO 309/42.

87. Colonel C.P. Stacey, Official History of the Canadian Army in the Second World War, Volume 1, Six Years of War (Ottawa, 1955), p. 538.

88. GO 438/43.

89. GO 124/39.

90. GO 135/39.

91. GO 44/41.

92. GO 44/41.

93. GO 311/42.

94. Colonel C.P. Stacey, Official History of the Canadian Army in the Second World War, Volume 1, Six Years of War (Ottawa, 1955), p. 147.

95. GO 18/46.

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