Volume 3, Part 1: Armour, Artillery and Field Engineer Regiments - ARMOUR REGIMENTS

THE SOUTH ALBERTA LIGHT HORSE

The South Alberta Light Horse Badge

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BADGE

Description

Upon a scroll Azure edged and inscribed SEMPER ALACER in letters Or, a stag's head affronté Argent, the antlers joined by two bars bearing the initials SALH Or, all below a plaque Azure edged and inscribed CANADA in letters Or and ensigned by the Royal Crown proper.

Symbolism

The word "CANADA" represents service to Canada, and the Crown, service to the Sovereign. The stag's head alludes to the pronghorn stag in the badge of the 15th Light Horse. "SALH" is an abbreviation of a form of the regimental title and "SEMPER ALACER" is the motto of the regiment

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MOTTO

SEMPER ALACER (Always brisk)

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MARCHES

A Southerly Wind and a Cloudy Sky

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ALLIANCE

British Army

The Princess of Wales's Royal Regiment (Queen's and Royal Hampshires); and The Light Dragoons

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BATTLE HONOURS

North West Rebellion

NORTH WEST CANADA, 1885.

The First World War

YPRES, 1915, '17; Gravenstafel; St. Julien; FESTUBERT, 1915; MOUNT SORREL; SOMME, 1916, '18; Flers-Courcelette; Thiepval; Ancre Heights; ARRAS, 1917, '18; Vimy, 1917; Arleux; Scarpe, 1917, '18; HILL 70; Passchendaele; AMIENS; Drocourt-Quéant; HINDENBURG LINE; Canal du Nord; Cambrai, 1918; PURSUIT TO MONS; FRANCE AND FLANDERS, 1915-18.

The Second World War

FALAISE; Falaise Road; The Laison; St. Lambert-sur-Dives; Moerbrugge; THE SCHELDT; Woensdrecht; The Lower Maas; Kapelsche Veer; THE RHINELAND; The Hochwald; Veen; Twente Canal; Bad Zwischenahn; NORTH-WEST EUROPE, 1944-1945.

LINEAGE

This Reserve Force regiment originated on 3 July 1905 and incorporates the following regiments and artillery battery.

The South Alberta Light Horse originated in Calgary, Alberta on 3 July 1905, when 'The 15th Light Horse' was authorized to be formed.1 It was redesignated the '15th Canadian Light Horse' on 15 March 1920.2 On 16 February 1936, it was amalgamated with 'The South Alberta Horse' (see below) and redesignated the '15th Alberta Light Horse'.3 It was redesignated the '15th (Reserve) Alberta Light Horse' on 7 November 1940.4 On 1 April 1946, it was amalgamated with the '22nd (Reserve) Field Battery, RCA' (see below), converted to artillery, and redesignated the '68th Light Anti-Aircraft Regiment, RCA'.5 On 28 September 1954, it was amalgamated with 'The South Alberta Regiment' (see below) and the '41st Anti-Tank Regiment (Self-Propelled), RCA' (see below) and redesignated 'The South Alberta Light Horse (29th Armoured Regiment)'.6 It was redesignated : 'The South Alberta Light Horse' on 19 May 1958;7 'The South Alberta Light Horse (RCAC)' on 7 October 1985;8 and 'The South Alberta Light Horse' on 14 August 1997.9 On 31 May 2006, it was amalgamated with the '19th Alberta Dragoons' (see below), retaining the same designation.10

Notes :

The 15th Canadian Light Horse was disbanded for the purpose of reorganization on 15 September 1920 and reorganized the same day (GO 230/20). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment.

On 1 November 1920, the 15th Canadian Light Horse was organized as a two regiment unit with the 1st Regiment on the Non Permanent Active Militia order of battle, and the 2nd Regiment on the Reserve order of battle (GO 185/20).

On 1 March 1922, the 1st Regiment was redesignated the 1st Regiment (12th Regiment, Canadian Mounted Rifles, CEF) (GO 38/22, and GO 74/26). The reserve unit was disbanded on 14 December 1936 (GO 3/37).

The 15th Canadian Light Horse were disbanded for the purpose amalgamation on 15 February 1936 and reorganized the next day (GO 34/36). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment.

The South Alberta Horse originated in Medicine Hat, Alberta on 1 April 1908, when the '21st Alberta Hussars' were authorized to be formed.11 It was redesignated 'The Alberta Mounted Rifles' on 15 March 1920.12 On 1 May 1922, it was amalgamated with the '23rd Alberta Rangers' (see below), retaining its designation.13 On 1 January 1931, it was reorganized into two separate regiments, designated: 'The Alberta Mounted Rifles' (subsequently redesignated the '19th Alberta Dragoons') (see below) and 'The South Alberta Horse.14 On 16 February 1936, it was amalgamated with '15th Canadian Light Horse', as above.

Notes :

Upon redesignation as The Alberta Mounted Rifles on 15 March 1920 (see above), it was organized as a three regiment unit with the 1st Regiment (3rd Canadian Mounted Rifles Battalion, CEF) on the Non Permanent Active Militia order of battle, the 2nd Regiment (12th Canadian Mounted Rifles Battalion, CEF) and the 3rd Regiment (13th Canadian Mounted Rifles Battalion, CEF) on the Reserve order of battle (see also GO 185/20).

The Alberta Mounted Rifles were disbanded for the purpose of reorganization on 15 March 1921 and reorganized the same day (GO 129/21). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment.

On 15 February 1922, the 3rd Regiment was redesignated the 2nd Regiment (13th Canadian Mounted Rifles Battalion, CEF) and placed on the active order and a new 3rd Regiment (no CEF designation) on the Reserve order was formed (GO 28/22).

The 2nd Regiment, The Alberta Mounted Rifles was disbanded for the purpose of reorganization on 15 February 1922 and reorganized the same day (GO 100/22). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment

On 1 May 1922, the amalgamated '23rd Alberta Rangers' were redesignated the 2nd Regiment (13th Mounted Rifles Battalion, CEF), Alberta Mounted Rifles' (GO 75/22).

On 15 February 1922, the 3rd Regiment was redesignated the 2nd Regiment and placed on the active order and the 2nd Regiment remained on the Reserve order as the 3rd Regiment without a CEF affiliation (GO 28/22).

On 15 November 1926, the 1st Regiment was redesignated the 1st Regiment (3rd Regiment Canadian Mounted Rifles, CEF) and the 2nd Regiment the 2nd Regiment (13th Regiment Canadian Mounted Rifles, CEF) (GO 74/26).

Upon redesignation as The South Alberta Horse on 1 January 1931 (see above), it was organized as a two regiment unit with the 1st Regiment (13th Regiment Canadian Mounted Rifles, CEF) on the Non Permanent Active Militia order of battle, and the 2nd (Reserve) Regiment (no CEF designation) on the Reserve order of battle (see also GO 3/31). The reserve unit was disbanded on 14 December 1936 (GO 3/37).

On 16 March 1932, the regiment was authorized to perpetuate the 'Rocky Mountain Rangers' of 1885 (GO 38/32).

The South Alberta Horse were disbanded for the purpose amalgamation on 15 February 1936 and reorganized the next day (GO 34/36). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment.

The 23rd Alberta Rangers originated in MacLeod, Alberta on 1 April 1908, when the '23rd Alberta Rangers' were authorized to be formed.15 On 1 May 1922, it was amalgamated with the 'Alberta Mounted Rifles', as above.

The 22nd (Reserve) Field Battery, RCA originated in Gleichen, Alberta on 2 February 1920, when the '22nd Battery, CFA' was authorized to be formed.16 It was redesignated: '22nd Field Battery, CA' on 1 July 1925;17 '22nd Field Battery, RCA' on 3 June 1935;18 '22nd (Reserve) Field Battery, RCA' on 7 November 1940;19 and '22nd Field Battery, RCA' on 14 November 1945.20 On 1 April 1946, it was amalgamated with the '15th (Reserve) Alberta Light Horse', as above.

The South Alberta Regiment originated in Calgary, Alberta on 1 April 1910, when the '103rd Regiment "Calgary Rifles"' was authorized to be formed.21 On 15 March 1920 it was reorganized as two separate regiments, designated 'The Calgary Regiment' (now 'The King's Own Calgary Regiment (RCAC)' and 'The Calgary Highlanders') and 'The Alberta Regiment'.22 On 15 May 1924, it was reorganized into two separate regiments, designated 'The North Alberta Regiment' (disbanded on 1 February 1936), and 'The South Alberta Regiment'.23 On 1 April 1936, it was amalgamated with 'C Company' of the '13th Machine Gun Battalion, CMGC' (now 'The King's Own Calgary Regiment').24 It was redesignated: '2nd (Reserve) Battalion, The South Alberta Regiment' on 7 November 1940;25 '2nd (Reserve) Battalion, The South Alberta Regiment (MG)' on 1 April 1942;26 and 'The South Alberta Regiment' on 1 April 1946.27 On 28 September 1954, it was amalgamated with the '68th Light Anti-Aircraft Regiment, RCA' and the '41st Anti-Tank Regiment (Self Propelled), RCA', as above.

Notes :

Upon reorganization as The Alberta Regiment on 15 March 1920 (see above), it was organized as a seven battalion regiment with the 1st Battalion (31st Battalion, CEF) on the Non Permanent Active Militia order of battle and the 2nd Battalion (89th Battalion, CEF), 3rd Battalion (113th Battalion, CEF), 4th Battalion (151st Battalion, CEF), 5th Battalion (175th Battalion, CEF), 6th Battalion (187th Battalion, CEF), and 7th Battalion (191st Battalion, CEF) on the Reserve order of battle

On 1 June 1921, the 2nd Battalion was redesignated the '2nd Battalion (31st Battalion, CEF)' and placed on the Non Permanent Active Militia order of battle (GO 157/21). Thus, both the 1st and 2nd Battalion had the same CEF secondary title designation.

Upon reorganization as The South Alberta Regiment on 15 May 1924 (see above), it was organized as a four battalion regiment with the 1st Battalion (31st Battalion, CEF) on the Non Permanent Active Militia order of battle and the 2nd Battalion (113th Battalion, CEF), 3rd Battalion (175th Battalion, CEF) and 4th Battalion (187th Battalion, CEF) on the Reserve order of battle. The reserve units were disbanded on 14 December 1936 (GO 3/37).

The lineage of 13th Machine Gun Battalion, CMGC (1919-1936) was assigned to 'The Calgary Regiment (Tank) (GO 149/37).

The 41st Anti-Tank Regiment (Self-Propelled), RCA originated in Calgary, Alberta on 1 April 1942, when the '41st (Reserve) Field Regiment, RCA' was authorized to be formed.28 It was redesignated the '41st Anti-Tank Regiment (Self Propelled), RCA' on 1 April 1946.29 On 28 September 1954, it was amalgamated with the '68th Light Anti-Aircraft Regiment, RCA' and the 'South Alberta Regiment', as above.

The 19th Alberta Dragoons originated in Edmonton, Alberta on 1 February 1908, when the '19th The Alberta Mounted Rifles' were authorized to be formed.30 It was redesignated the '19th Alberta Dragoons' on 3 January 1911.31 On 16 February 1936, it was amalgamated with 'The Alberta Mounted Rifles' (see below), retaining its designation.32 It was redesignated the '19th (Reserve) Alberta Dragoons' on 7 November 1940.33 On 1 April 1946, it was amalgamated with the '2nd (Reserve) Battalion, The Edmonton Fusiliers' (see below) and redesignated the '19th (Alberta) Armoured Car Regiment, RCAC'.34 It was redesignated: '19th Alberta Armoured Car Regiment' on 4 February 1949;35 '19th Alberta Dragoons (19th Armoured Car Regiment)' on 1 November 1954;36 and '19th Alberta Dragoons' on 19 May 1958.37 It was reduced to nil strength and transferred to the Supplementary Order of Battle on 28 February 1965.38 On 31 May 2006, it was removed from the Supplementary Order of battle and amalgamated with the 'South Alberta Light Horse', as above.

Notes :

The 19th Alberta Dragoons were disbanded for the purpose of reorganization on 2 August 1920 and reorganized the same day (GO 172/20). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment.

On 1 November 1920, the 19th Alberta Dragoons were organized as a two regiment unit with the 1st Regiment on the Non Permanent Active Militia order of battle, and the 2nd Regiment on the Reserve order of battle (GO 185/20). The reserve unit was disbanded on 14 December 1936 (GO 3/37).

The 19th Alberta Dragoons were disbanded for the purpose amalgamation on 15 February 1936 and reorganized the next day (GO 34/36). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment.

The Alberta Mounted Rifles originated in Medicine Hat, Alberta on 1 April 1908, when the '21st Alberta Hussars' were authorized to be formed.39 It was redesignated 'The Alberta Mounted Rifles' on 15 March 1920.40 On 1 May 1922, it was amalgamated with the '23rd Alberta Rangers' (see above), retaining its designation.41 On 1 January 1931, it was reorganized into two separate regiments, designated: 'The Alberta Mounted Rifles' and 'The South Alberta Horse' (see above). On 16 February 1936, it was amalgamated with '19th Alberta Dragoons', as above.

Notes :

Upon redesignation as The Alberta Mounted Rifles on 15 March 1920 (see above), it was organized as a three regiment unit with the 1st Regiment (3rd Canadian Mounted Rifles Battalion, CEF) on the Non Permanent Active Militia order of battle, the 2nd Regiment (12th Canadian Mounted Rifles Battalion, CEF) and the 3rd Regiment (13th Canadian Mounted Rifles Battalion, CEF) on the Reserve order of battle (see also GO 185/20).

The Alberta Mounted Rifles were disbanded for the purpose of reorganization on 15 March 1921 and reorganized the same day (GO 129/21). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment.

On 15 February 1922, the 3rd Regiment was redesignated the 2nd Regiment (13th Canadian Mounted Rifles Battalion, CEF) and placed on the Non Permanent Active Militia order and a new 3rd Regiment (no CEF designation) on the Reserve order was formed (GO 28/22).

The 2nd Regiment, The Alberta Mounted Rifles was disbanded for the purpose of reorganization on 15 February 1922 and reorganized the same day (GO 100/22). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment

On 1 May 1922, the amalgamated '23rd Alberta Rangers' were redesignated the 2nd Regiment (13th Mounted Rifles Battalion, CEF), Alberta Mounted Rifles' (GO 75/22).

On 15 November 1926, the 1st Regiment was redesignated the 1st Regiment (3rd Regiment Canadian Mounted Rifles, CEF) and the 2nd Regiment the 2nd Regiment (13th Regiment Canadian Mounted Rifles, CEF) (GO 74/26).

Upon reorganization on 1 January 1931 (see above), The Alberta Mounted Rifles were organized as a two regiment unit. A new 2nd (Reserve) Regiment on the Reserve order of battle was authorized and the existing 2nd Regiment and 3rd (Reserve) Regiment became The South Alberta Horse (GO 3/31). The reserve regiment was disbanded on 14 December 1936 (GO 3/37).

The Alberta Mounted Rifles were disbanded for the purpose amalgamation on 15 February 1936 and reorganized the next day (GO 34/36). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment.

The Edmonton Fusiliers originated in Edmonton, Alberta on 1 April 1908, when the '101st Regiment' was authorized to be formed.42 It was redesignated: '101st Regiment "Edmonton Fusiliers" on 1 March 1909;43 and 'The Edmonton Regiment' on 15 March 1920.44 It was reorganized on 15 May 1924 into two separate regiments, designated 'The Edmonton Regiment' (now The Loyal Edmonton Regiment (4th Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry)), and 'The Edmonton Fusiliers'.45 On 1 April 1936, it was amalgamated with 'A Company' of the '13th Machine Gun Battalion, CMGC' (now 'The King's Own Calgary Regiment').46 It was redesignated: 'The Edmonton Fusiliers (MG) on 15 December 1936;47 '2nd (Reserve) Battalion, The Edmonton Fusiliers (MG)' on 7 November 1941;48 and '2nd (Reserve) Battalion, The Edmonton Fusiliers' on 1 April 1941.49 On 1 April 1946, it was amalgamated with the 19th (Reserve) Alberta Dragoons, as above.

Notes :

Upon redesignation as The Edmonton Regiment on 15 March 1920 (see above), it was organized as a five battalion regiment with the 1st Battalion (172nd Battalion, CEF) and 2nd Battalion (Edmonton Fusiliers) (9th Battalion, CEF) on the Non Permanent Active Militia order of battle and the 3rd Battalion (51st Battalion, CEF), 4th Battalion (63rd Battalion, CEF) and 5th Battalion (66th Battalion, CEF) on the Reserve order of battle.

The Edmonton Regiment was disbanded for the purpose of reorganization on 15 September 1920 and reorganized the same day (GO 253/20). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment.

On Upon reorganization on 15 May 1924 (see above), The Edmonton Fusiliers were organized as a three battalion regiment with the 1st Battalion (9th Battalion, CEF) on the Non Permanent Active Militia order of battle and the 2nd Battalion (66th Battalion, CEF) and 3rd Battalion (202nd Battalion, CEF) on the Reserve order of battle.

On 15 September 1929, The Edmonton Fusiliers were authorized an additional battalion, designated the 4th (Reserve) Battalion (138th Battalion, CAF) (GO 112/29). The reserve units were disbanded on 14 December 1936 (GO 3/37).

The Edmonton Fusiliers were disbanded for the purpose of reorganization on 14 December 1936 and reorganized the same day (GO 147/36). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment.

The perpetuation of the 13th Machine Gun Battalion, CMGC (1919-1936) was assigned to The Calgary Regiment (Tank) (GO 149/37).

Perpetuation

'Rocky Mountain Rangers' of 1885; '3rd', '12th' and '13th Regiment(s), Canadian Mounted Rifles, CEF'; '9th', '31st', '66th', '113th', '138th', '175th', '187th' and '202nd "Overseas" Battalion(s), CEF'; and '22nd Battery, CFA, CEF'.

Headquarters Location

Medicine Hat, Alberta

OPERATIONAL HISTORY

North West Rebellion

The Rocky Mountain Rangers were mobilized for active service on 10 April 1885.50 They patrolled the area in and around Medicine Hat, Alberta and the international border.51 The unit was disbanded on 18 September 1885.52

The First World War

Details of the 19th Alberta Dragoons were placed on active service on 6 August 1914 for local protective duty.53

The 19th Alberta Dragoons recruited the '1st Divisional Cavalry Squadron, CEF', which was authorized on 10 August 1914.54 It embarked for Great Britain on 1 October 1914.55 This squadron was redesignated: 'A Squadron, Canadian Corps Cavalry Regiment, CEF' on 12 February 1916;56 and 'A Squadron, Canadian Light Horse, CEF' on 21 February 1917.57 It disembarked in France on 12 February 1915,58 where it fought in France and Flanders as part of the Canadian Corps until the end of the war.59 The squadron was disbanded on 6 November 1920.60

Details of the 21st Alberta Hussars were placed on active service on 6 August 1914 for local protective duty.61

Details of the 23rd Alberta Rangers were placed on active service on 6 August 1914 for local protective duty.62

Details of the 103rd Regiment "Calgary Rifles" were placed on active service on 6 August 1914 for local protection duties.63

The '3rd Regiment, Canadian Mounted Rifles, CEF', which was authorized on 7 November 1914,64 embarked for England on 12 June 1915.65 It landed in France on 22 September 1915,66 where it fought as part of the 1st Canadian Mounted Rifles Brigade until its personnel were absorbed by the '1st' and '2nd, Battalion, Canadian Mounted Rifles, CEF' on 31 December 1915.67. The regiment was disbanded on 12 August 1917.>68

The '12th Regiment. Canadian Mounted Rifles Battalion, CEF', which was authorized on 15 March 1915,69 embarked for England on 8 October 1915.70 Its personnel were absorbed by the 'Canadian Cavalry Depot, CEF' on 3 February 1916 to provide reinforcements to the Canadian Corps in the field.71 The regiment was disbanded on 5 April 1918.72

The '13th Regiment. Canadian Mounted Rifles, CEF', which was authorized on 15 March 1915,73 embarked for England on 29 June 1916.74 The regiment was converted to infantry and redesignated the '13th "Overseas" Canadian Mounted Rifles Battalion, CEF' on 23 April 1916.75 Its personnel were absorbed by various units on 19 July 1916 to provide reinforcements to the Canadian Corps in the field.76 The battalion was disbanded on 15 September 1917.77

The 9th Battalion, which was authorized on 10 August 1914 as the '9th Battalion, CEF',78 embarked for Britain on 1 October 1914.79 It was redesignated '9th Reserve Infantry Battalion, CEF' on 10 December 1915, to provide reinforcements for the Canadian Corps in the field.80 The battalion was disbanded on 15 September 1917.81

The '31st Battalion, CEF', which was authorized on 7 November 1914,82 embarked for Britain on 17 May 1915.83 On 18 September 1915 it disembarked in France,84 where it fought with the 6th Infantry Brigade, 2nd Canadian Division in France and Flanders until the end of the war.85 The battalion was disbanded on 30 August 1920.86

The 66th Battalion, which was authorized on 20 April 1915 as the '66th "Overseas" Battalion, CEF',87 embarked for Britain on 28 April 1916.88 Its personnel were absorbed by the '9th Reserve Battalion, CEF' on 7 July 1916 to provide reinforcements for the Canadian Corps in the field.89 The battalion was disbanded on 30 August 1920.90

The 113th Battalion, which was authorized on 22 December 1915 as the '113th "Overseas" Battalion, CEF',91 embarked for Britain on 25 September 1916.92 Its personnel were absorbed by the '17th Reserve Battalion, CEF' on 8 October 1916 to provide reinforcements for the Canadian Corps in the field.93 The battalion was disbanded on 1 September 1917.94

The 138th Battalion, which was authorized on 22 December 1915 as the '138th "Overseas" Battalion, CEF',95 embarked for Britain on 22 August 1916.96 Its personnel were absorbed by the '128th "Overseas" Battalion, CEF' on 8 December 1916 to provide reinforcements for the Canadian Corps in the field.97 The battalion was disbanded on 30 August 1920.98

The 175th Battalion, which was authorized on 15 July 1916 as the '175th "Overseas" Battalion, CEF',99 embarked for Britain on 3 October 1916.100 Its personnel were absorbed by the '21st Reserve Battalion, CEF' on 10 January 1917 to provide reinforcements for the Canadian Corps in the field.101 The battalion was disbanded on 17 July 1917.102

102The 187th Battalion, which was authorized on 15 July 1916 as the '187th "Overseas" Battalion, CEF',103 embarked for Britain on 16 December 1916.104 Its personnel were absorbed by the '21st Reserve Battalion, CEF' on 20 January 1917 to provide reinforcements for the Canadian Corps in the field.105 The battalion was disbanded on 11 April 1918.106

The 202nd Battalion, which was authorized on 15 July 1916 as the '202nd "Overseas" Battalion, CEF',107 embarked for Britain on 23 November 1916.108 Its personnel were absorbed by the '9th Reserve Battalion, CEF' on 27 May 1917 to provide reinforcements for the Canadian Corps in the field.109 The battalion was disbanded on 18 February 1918.110

The 22nd Battery, which was authorized on 10 August 1914 as the '22nd Battery, CEF',111 embarked for Britain on 27 September 1914.112 Its personnel were absorbed by the 'Canadian Reserve Artillery Brigade, CEF' in March 1915;113 and the unit was reformed on 19 September 1915 under the designation '30th (Howitzer) Battery, CFA, CEF'.114 On 25 October 1915, it was redesignated the '22nd (Howitzer) Battery, CFA, CEF'.115 It disembarked in France on 19 January 1916,116 where it provided field artillery support as part of the '6th (Howitzer) Brigade, CFA, CEF' in France and Flanders.117 The battery was disbanded on 23 October 1920.118

The Second World War

The 15th Alberta Light Horse mobilized the '31st (Alberta) Reconnaissance Battalion, CAC, CASF' for active service on 18 March 1942.119 It was redesignated the '31st (Alberta) Reconnaissance Regiment, CAC, CASF' on 8 June 1942.120 This regiment served in Canada in a home defence role as part of Pacific Command.121 It embarked on 31 January 1945 for Britain, where it provided reinforcements to the Canadian Army in the field.122 The regiment was disbanded on 15 February 1945.123

The 22nd Field Battery, in conjunction with the '78th Field Battery, RCA' mobilized the '22nd/78th Field Battery, RCA, CASF' for active service on 24 May 1940.124 This unit was reorganized as two separate batteries on 1 January 1941, designated the '22nd Field Battery, RCA, CASF' and the '78th Field Battery, RCA, CASF'.125 The 22nd Field Battery embarked for Britain on 1 November 1941.126 The battery landed in Normandy, France as part of the 13th Field Regiment, 3rd Canadian Infantry Division on 6 June 1944 and continued to serve in North West Europe until the end of the war.127 The battery was disbanded on 14 November 1945.128

A '2nd 22nd Field Battery, RCA, CAOF' was mobilized on 1 June 1945 for service with the Canadian Army Occupation Force in Germany.129 This battery was disbanded on 13 April 1946.130

The South Alberta Regiment mobilized 'The South Alberta Regiment, CASF' for active service on 24 May 1940.131 It was redesignated: '1st Battalion, The South Alberta Regiment, CASF' on 7 November 1940;132 '29th Armoured Regiment (The South Alberta Regiment), CAC, CASF' on 26 January 1942,133 and upon conversion to armour; '29th Armoured Reconnaissance Regiment (The South Alberta Regiment), CAC, CASF' on 1 January 1943;134 and '29th Armoured Reconnaissance Regiment (The South Alberta Regiment), RCAC, CASF' on 2 August 1945.135 It embarked on 21 August 1942 for Britain.136 The regiment landed in France on 24 July 1944 as part of the 10th Infantry Brigade, 4th Canadian Armoured Division and continued to fight in North West Europe until the end of the war.137 The regiment was disbanded on 15 February 1946.138

Details from The Edmonton Fusiliers were called out on service on 26 August 1939 and then placed on active service on 1 September 1939, under the designation 'The Edmonton Fusiliers (MG), CASF (Details)', for local protection duties.139 The details called out on active service were disbanded on 31 December 1940.140 The regiment mobilized 'The Edmonton Fusiliers, CASF' for active service on 24 May 1940.141 It was redesignated '1st Battalion, The Edmonton Fusiliers, CASF' on 7 November 1940.142 It served in Canada in a home defence role as part of the 13th Infantry Brigade, 6th Canadian Division.143 The 1st Battalion was disbanded on 14 November 1945.144 The regiment subsequently mobilized the '3rd Battalion, The Edmonton Fusiliers, CASF' for active service on 12 May 1942.145 This unit served in Canada in a home defence role as part of the 16th Infantry Brigade, 8th Canadian Division.146 The 3rd Battalion was disbanded on 15 August 1943.147

GUIDON

The South Alberta Light Horse

CAMP FLAG

The South Alberta Light Horse


1. GO 154/05. Formed from four newly organized cavalry squadrons at: Calgary (A Squadron), MacLeod (B Squadron), High River (C Squadron), and Cochrane (D Squadron) / Formé de quatre escadrons de cavalerie nouvellement organisés à : Calgary (A Squadron), MacLeod (B Squadron), High River (C Squadron), et Cochrane (D Squadron).

2. GO 26/20.

3. GO 34/36.

4. GO 273/40.

5. GO 115/46.

6. CAO 76-3, Pt 'B', Supp Issue No. 415/54.

7. CAO 76-3, Pt 'B', Supp Issue No. 602/58.

8. MOO 342/85, 7 Oct 85 / DMO 342/85, 7 oct 85.

9. MOO 97/221, 14 Aug 97 / DMO 97/221, 14 août 97.

10. MOO/DMO 2006009

11. GO 60/08; and/et GO 120/08. Formed from the independent 'D Squadron, Canadian Mounted Rifles' and one newly organized squadron, authorized on the following dates: 'A Squadron' ('I' Squadron, Canadian Mounted Rifles, 1 June 1901), and the newly organized 'B Squadron' / Formé de l'escadron indépendant « D Squadron, Canadian Mounted Rifles » et d'un escadron nouvellement organisé, selon les dates suivantes : « A Squadron » ('I' Squadron, Canadian Mounted Rifles, 1 juin 1901) et « B Squadron ».

12. GO 26/20.

13. GO 75/22.

14. GO 3/31. Formed from the 2nd Regiment (13th Regiment, Canadian Mounted Rifles, CEF), formerly the '23rd Alberta Rangers', and the 3rd (Reserve) Regiment of 'The Alberta Mounted Rifles' / Formé du « 2nd Regiment (13th Regiment, Canadian Mounted Rifles, CEF), l'ancien « 23rd Alberta Rangers », et le « 3rd (Reserve) Regiment du « The Alberta Mounted Rifles ».

15. GO 60/08; and/et GO 120/08. Formed from an independent squadron designated 'The Alberta Rangers' and three newly authorized squadrons of mounted rifles. The Alberta Rangers originated as 'D Squadron' of 'The 15th Light Horse' on 3 July 1905 (GO 154/05). It was authorized as an independent squadron on 1 April 1906 (GO 50/06) and designated 'The Alberta Rangers' on 1 May 1906 (GO 88/06). / Formé d'un escadron indépendant baptisé le « The Alberta Rangers » et trois escadrons de fusiliers montés nouvellement autorisés. Le « The Alberta Rangers » fut autorisé le 3 juillet 1905, lorsque le « D Squadron » du « The 15th Light Horse » fut autorisé (GO 154/05). Il fut autorisé comme un escadron indépendant le 1er avril 1906 (GO 50/06) et il fut baptisé le « The Alberta Rangers » le 1er mai 1906 (GO 88/06).

16. GO 13/20.

17. GO 82/25.

18. GO 58/35.

19. GO 273/40.

20. GO 52/46.

21. GO 38/10.

22. GO 32/20. Although authorized, The Alberta Regiment was not organized until 1 April 1921 (GO 157/21) / Même s'il fut autorisé, le « The Alberta Regiment » ne fut pas organisé avant le 1er avril 1921 (GO 157/21).

23. GO 68/24.

24. GO 149/36.

25. GO 273/40; and/et GO 42/41.

26. GO 242/42.

27. GO 115/46.

28. GO 241/42.

29. GO 115/46.

30. GO 11/08. Formed from four independent squadrons of Canadian Mounted Rifles authorized on the following dates: 'A Squadron' at Edmonton (A Squadron, Canadian Mounted Rifles, 1 December 1905), 'B Squadron' at Strathcona (B Squadron, Canadian Mounted Rifles, 1 December 1905), 'C Squadron' at Fort Saskatchewan (C Squadron, Canadian Mounted Rifles, 1 December 1905), and 'D Squadron' at Edmonton (E Squadron, Canadian Mounted Rifles, 2 April 1907), / Formé de quatre escadrons de « Canadian Mounted Rifles » indépendants autorisés selon les dates suivantes : « A Squadron » à Edmonton (A Squadron, Canadian Mounted Rifles, 1er décembre 1905), « B Squadron » à Strathcona (B Squadron, Canadian Mounted Rifles, 1er décembre 1905), « C Squadron » à Fort Saskatchewan (C Squadron, Canadian Mounted Rifles, 1er décembre 1905), et « D Squadron » à Edmonton (E Squadron, Canadian Mounted Rifles, 2 avril 1907).

31. GO 5/11.

32. GO 34/36.

33. GO 122/41.

34. GO 115/46.

35. CAO 76-3, Supp Issue No. 114/49.

36. CAO 76-3, Pt 'B', Supp Issue No 414/54.

37. CAO 76-3, Pt 'B', Supp Issue No. 602/58.

38. SD 1 Letter No. 58/64; and/et Western Command Message 2001-3/1 (G), 18 Oct 65.

39. GO 60/08; and/et GO 120/08. Formed from one independent squadron of Canadian Mounted Rifles authorized on the following date: 'A Squadron' (D Squadron, Canadian Mounted Rifles, 1 June 1901 (formerly "I" Squadron)) and the newly authorized 'B Squadron' / Formé d'un escadron de « Canadian Mounted Rifles » indépendant autorisé selon le date suivante : « A Squadron » (D Squadron, Canadian Mounted Rifles, 1er juin 1901 (autrefois l'escadron « I »)) et le nouvellement autorisé « B Squadron ». See also end 11/Voir aussi la note 11 en fin de texte.

40. GO 26/20.

41. GO 75/22.

42. GO 60/08.

43. GO 30/09.

44. GO 32/20.

45. GO 68/24.

46. GO 149/36.

47. GO 147/36.

48. GO 42/41.

49. GO 122/41.

50. MGO 8/85.

51. General Sir Frederick Middleton, Suppression of the Rebellion in the North West Territories of Canada 1885, (Toronto, 1948), p. 42.

52. MGO 21/85.

53. GO 142/14.

54. PC 2067, 6 August 1914, and/et memorandum Preliminary Instructions for Mobn. War 1914, BGen V.A.S. Williams, Adjutant-General, Canadian Militia to O.Cs. Divisions and Districts, 10 August 1914, reprinted in Colonel A.F. Duguid, Official History of the Canadian Forces in the Great War, 1914-1919, vol. 1 - Appendices (Ottawa, 1938), pp. 37-39.

55. Colonel A.F. Duguid, Official History of the Canadian Forces in the Great War, 1914-1919, vol. 1 - Appendices (Ottawa, 1938), pp. 112 and/et 114.

56. War Diary, Canadian Light Horse, RG/GE 9, Series III-D-3, Volume 4954, File/dossier 490, Appendix 1 - Letters, Canadian Corps G 706, 4 May 1916, and A. 29/59, 12 May 1916.

57. Ibid, 3 March 1917/3 mars 1917, Letter, War Office 121/Overseas/3407 (SD2), 21-2-17.

58. Colonel A. Fortescue Duguid, Official History of the Canadian Forces in The Great War 1914-1919, General Series Vol. 1, August 1914-September 1915, Appendices, (Ottawa, 1938), p. 454.

59. G.W.L. Nicholson, Official History of the Canadian Army in the First World War, Canadian Expeditionary Force 1914-1919 (Ottawa, 1962), passim.

60. GO 207/20. As part of the Canadian Light Horse / En tant que composante du « Canadian Light Horse ».

61. GO 142/14.

62. Ibid.

63. Ibid.

64. GO 36/15.

65. CEF Sailing List, vol. XII.

66. War Diary, 3rd Regiment, Canadian Mounted Rifles, 22 September 1915/22 septembre 1915, RG/GE 9, Series III-D-3, Volume 4946, File/dossier 463.

67. Ibid, 31 December 1915/31 décembre 1915. 'A' and 'C' Squadrons were transferred to the '1st Battalion, Canadian Mounted Rifles' and the headquarters and 'B' Squadron to the '2nd Battalion, Canadian Mounted Rifles' / Les escadrons « A » et « C » furent transférés au « 1st Battalion, Canadian Mounted Rifles » et le quartier-général et l'Escadron « B » au « 2nd Battalion, Canadian Mounted Rifles ».

68. GO 82/18.

69. GO 36/15.

70. CEF Sailing List, vol. XII.

71. Edwin Pye Papers, Summary of History of C.E.F. Units - 12th Regiment C.M.R., Document Collection/Collection de documents 74/672, Series/séries VI, Box/boîte 17, Folder/chemise 6.

72. GO 60/18. GO 207/20 also details the disbandment of the regiment but at a later date of 6 November 1920 / Le GO 207/20 décrit également le démembrement du régiment mais à une date ultérieure, soit le 6 novembre 1920.

73. GO 36/15.

74. CEF Sailing List, vol. XII.

75. Telegram/télégramme Adjutant General to/à Inspector General for Western Canada, 23 April 1916/23 avril 1916, NAC/AN, RG/GE 24, vol. 1532, file/dossier 683-96-2; Telegram/télégramme General Officer Commanding Military District No. 13 to/à Secretary Militia Council, 22 May 1916/ 22 mai 1916. NAC/AN, RG/GE 24, vol. 1516, file/dossier 683-30-2; and/et MO 34/17.

76. Edwin Pye Papers, Summary of History of C.E.F. Units - 13th Regiment C.M.R., Document Collection/Collection de documents 74/672, Series/séries VI, Box/boîte 17, Folder/chemise 6.

77. GO 82/18.

78. PC 2067, 6 August 1914, and/et memorandum Preliminary Instructions for Mobn. War 1914, BGen V.A.S. Williams, Adjutant-General, Canadian Militia to O.Cs. Divisions and Districts, 10 August 1914, reprinted in Colonel A.F. Duguid, Official History of the Canadian Forces in the Great War, 1914-1919, vol. 1 - Appendices (Ottawa, 1938), pp. 37-39.

79. Colonel A.F. Duguid, Official History of the Canadian Forces in the Great War, 1914-1919, vol. 1 - Appendices (Ottawa, 1938), pp. 112 and/et 117.

80. CTDO 4009, 10 December 1915.

81. GO 82/18.

82. GO 36/15.

83. CEF Sailing List, vol. II.

84. Edwin Pye Papers, Summary of History of C.E.F. Units - 31st Battalion, Document Collection/Collection de documents 74/672, Series/séries IV, Box/boîte 11, Folder/chemise 31.

85. G.W.L. Nicholson, Official History of the Canadian Army in the First World War, Canadian Expeditionary Force 1914-1919 (Ottawa, 1962), passim.

86. GO 149/20.

87. GO 103a/15.

88. CEF Sailing List, vol. IV. The Battalion also sent reinforcing drafts overseas on 11 September 1915 and 22 January 1916 / Le bataillon envoya aussi un service des renforts outremer le 25 septembre 1915 et le 22 janvier 1916.

89. Edwin Pye Papers, Summary of History of C.E.F. Units - 66th Battalion, Document Collection/Collection de documents 74/672, Series/séries IV, Box/boîte 12, Folder/chemise 66; and/et CTDO 3666/16.

90. GO 149/20.

91. GO 151/15.

92. CEF Sailing List, vol. VI.

93. Edwin Pye Papers, Summary of History of C.E.F. Units - 113th Battalion, Document Collection/Collection de documents 74/672, Series/séries IV, Box/boîte 12, Folder/chemise 113.

94. 82/18.

95. GO 151/15.

96. CEF Sailing List, vol. VII.

97. Edwin Pye Papers, Summary of History of C.E.F. Units - 138th Battalion, Document Collection/Collection de documents 74/672, Series/séries IV, Box/boîte 12, Folder/chemise 138. The battalion contributed personnel to the '47th', '50th', '137th' and '175th "Overseas" Battalion(s), CEF' prior to its remaining personnel being absorbed by the 128th Battalion / Le personnel du bataillon passa aux « 47th », « 50th », « 137th » et « 175th "Overseas" Battalion(s), CEF » avant que son personnel restant ne soit intégré du sein du « 128th Battalion ».

98. GO 149/20.

99. GO 69/16.

100. CEF Sailing List, vol. IX.

101. CRO 212/17.

102. GO 82/18.

103. GO 69/16.

104. CEF Sailing List, vol. IX.

105. CRO 271/17.

106. GO 82/18.

107. GO 69/16.

108. CEF Sailing List, vol. X.

109. CRO 1560/17.

110. GO 82/18.

111. PC 2067, 6 August 1914, and/et memorandum Preliminary Instructions for Mobn. War 1914, BGen V.A.S. Williams, Adjutant-General, Canadian Militia to O.Cs. Divisions and Districts, 10 August 1914, reprinted in Colonel A.F. Duguid, Official History of the Canadian Forces in the Great War, 1914-1919, vol. 1 - Appendices (Ottawa, 1938), pp. 37-39.

112. Ibid, pp. 110-115.

113. Canadian Artillery Association, Officers who served Overseas in the Great War with the Canadian Artillery, (Ottawa, 1922), p. 6.

114. Ibid.

115. War Diary, 6th Brigade, Canadian Field Artillery, 26 October 1915/26 octobre 1915, RG9/GE9, Series III-D-3, Vol. 4969, File/dossier 543.

116. Ibid, 19 January 1916/19 janvier 1916.

117. G.W.L. Nicholson, The Gunners of Canada. The History of the Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery, vol. 1 (Toronto, 1967), passim.

118. GO 191/20.

119. GO 147/42. Many Alberta based Non-Permanent Active Militia units also contributed to its mobilization, in particular the 19th Alberta Dragoons / Plusieurs unités de la Milice active non-permanente de l'Alberta ont aussi contribuées à sa mobilisation, en particulier le « 19th Alberta Dragoons ».

120. GO 455/42.

121. Colonel C.P. Stacey, Official History of the Canadian Army in the Second World War, Volume 1, Six Years of War (Ottawa, 1955), p. 539.

122. Memorandum, 31st (Alta) Recce Regt in Second War, Kardex 141.43A1 (D1).

123. GO 231/45.

124. GO 184/40; and/et GO 50/41.

125. GO 45/41.

126. G.W.L. Nicholson, The Gunners of Canada. The History of the Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery, vol. II, 1919-1967 (Toronto, 1972), p. 88.

127. Ibid, passim.

128. GO 52/46.

129. GO 319/45.

130. GO 201/46.

131. GO 184/40; and/et GO 50/41.

132. GO 42/41.

133. GO 132/42.

134. GO 223/43.

135. GO 275/45. The Canadian Armoured Corps was redesignated 'Royal Canadian Armoured Corps' on this date / Le « Canadian Armoured Corps » fut rebaptisé « Royal Canadian Armoured Corps » à cette date.

136. Donald E. Graves, South Albertas. A Canadian Regiment at War (Toronto, 1998), p. 60.

137. Ibid, passim.

138. GO 111/46.

139. GO 124/39; and/et GO 135/39.

140. GO 44/41.

141. GO 184/40; and/et GO 50/41.

142. GO 42/41.

143. Colonel C.P. Stacey, Official History of the Canadian Army in the Second World War, Volume 1, Six Years of War (Ottawa, 1955), p. 538.

144. GO 18/46.

145. GO 309/42.

146. Colonel C.P. Stacey, Official History of the Canadian Army in the Second World War, Volume 1, Six Years of War (Ottawa, 1955), p. 539.

147. GO 438/43.

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