Volume 3, Part 1: Armour, Artillery and Field Engineer Regiments - Artillery Regiments

1ST REGIMENT, ROYAL CANADIAN HORSE ARTILLERY

The following document is available for downloading or viewing:

For more information on accessing this file, please visit our help page.


LINEAGE

This Regular Force regiment originated in Kingston, Ontario and Quebec City, Quebec on 1 December 1898, when the 'Royal Canadian Artillery (Field Division)' of The Royal Canadian Artillery was authorized to be formed.1 It was redesignated: 'Royal Canadian Field Artillery' on 1 June 1901;2 'Royal Canadian Horse Artillery' on 1 September 1905;3 '71st Regiment (Royal Canadian Horse Artillery)' on 16 October 1946;4 '1st Field Regiment, Royal Canadian Horse Artillery' on 7 July 1949;5 and '1st Regiment, Royal Canadian Horse Artillery' on 18 June 1951.6

Headquarters Location

Shilo, Manitoba

Allocated Batteries

'A' Battery, RCHA
'B' Battery, RCHA
'C' Battery, RCHA

ALLIANCE

British Army

1st Regiment, Royal Horse Artillery

OPERATIONAL HISTORY

The North West Rebellion

The service of 'A' and 'B' Batteries of the Regiment during the Rebellion pre-date the formation of the Royal Canadian Horse Artillery. See the branch chart for further details.

South African War

The Royal Canadian Artillery (Field Division) mobilized the ?Brigade Division, Royal Canadian Artillery' for active service on 20 December 1899.10 The brigade embarked for Africa on 21 February 1900,11 where its batteries provided field artillery support to the Imperial forces in the eastern Transvaal, north Cape Colony, Griqualand West and with the Rhodesian Field Force.12 The active service brigade was disbanded on 21 January 1901.13

The First World War

The Royal Canadian Horse Artillery was placed on active service on 6 August 1914 for instructional and camp administration duties.14 On 26 August 1914 it mobilized the 'Royal Canadian Horse Artillery Brigade, CEF',15 which embarked for England on 30 September 1914.16 The regiment disembarked in France on 20 July 1915,17 where it provided mobile field artillery support as part of the 'Canadian Cavalry Brigade, CEF' in France and Flanders until the end of the war.18 The brigade was disbanded on 23 October 1920.19

The Second World War

The Royal Canadian Horse Artillery mobilized for active service as the '1st Field Brigade, RCA, CASF' on 1 September 1939.20 It was redesignated '1st Field Regiment, RCA, CASF' on 21 December 1939.21 The regiment embarked for England in December 1939 and in June 1940 it went to France as part of the Second British Expeditionary Force, reaching a point west of Le Mans before being ordered back.22 It was redesignated '1st Field Regiment, RCHA, CASF' on 1 January 1941.23 The regiment landed in Sicily in July 1943 and in Italy in September 1943, providing field artillery support for the 1st Canadian Infantry Division. In March 1945 the regiment moved with the 1st Canadian Corps to North West Europe where it served until the end of the war.24 The overseas regiment was disbanded on 25 August 1945.25

On 1 June 1945 a second Active Force component of the regiment was mobilized for service in the Pacific theatre of operations under the designation '1st Canadian Field Artillery Battalion, RCA, CASF'.26 It was redesignated: '2nd/1st Field Regiment, RCHA, CASF' on 1 September 1945;27 and '71st Regiment, RCHA, CASF' on 1 March 1946.28 On 27 June 1946 it was embodied in the Permanent Force.29

United Nations Operations - Korea

The regiment served in theatre from May 1952 to April 1953 as part of the 25th Canadian Infantry Brigade Group, 1st Commonwealth Division.30

Top of Page


1. MGO 111/98. Formed from two independent Permanent Force batteries, 'A' and 'B' Batteries, of garrison artillery [authorized 20 October 1871] and a third newly authorized, but not formed, 'C' Battery / Formé de deux batteries indépendantes de la force permanente, batteries « A » et « B », de l'artillerie de garnison (autorisées le 20 octobre 1871) et d'une troisième, batterie « C », nouvellement autorisée mais non formée.

2. GO 71/01.

3. GO 200/05.

4. GO 259/46.

5. CAO 76-2, Supp Issue No. 136/49.

6. CAO 76-2, Pt 'B', Supp Issue No. 251/51.

7. CAO 220-3, 7 février 1955.

8. CAO 220-3, 17 février 1964.

9. CFOO 12.3.2, 12 Jan 78 / OOFC 12.3.2, 12 jan 78.

10. MO No. 265/99. The batteries of the brigade were designated 'C', 'D', and 'E' Batteries, Royal Canadian Artillery. On 16 January 1900, due to a shortage of personnel, 'A' and 'B' Batteries were temporarily amalgamated under the designation 'A Battery, Field Division, Royal Canadian Artillery' (MO No. 12/1900) / Les batteries de la brigade furent baptisées « C, D et E Batteries, Royal Canadian Artillery ». Le 16 janvier 1900, en raison d'une pénurie de personnel, les batteries « A » et « B » furent temporairement fusionnées sous l'appellation de « A Battery, Field Division, Royal Canadian Artillery » (MO No. 12/1900).

11. MO No. 290/1900.

12. Kardex 500.009 (D79), South Africa, Actions, Medals, etc.

13. GO 21/01.

14. GO 142/14. The RCHA was called out to provide utilitarian services at Camp Valcartier. Initially, it was not part of the Expeditionary Force, though many of its personnel joined CEF units / La RCHA fut appelée à fournir des services utilitaires au Camp Valcartier. Initialement, elle ne faisait pas partie du Corps expéditionnaire canadien, bien que plusieurs membres de son personnel se joignèrent aux unités du CEC.

15. G.W.L. Nicholson, The Gunners of Canada. The History of the Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery, vol. 1 (Toronto, 1967), p.198.

16. Colonel A. Fortescue Duguid, Official History of the Canadian Forces in The Great War 1914-1919, General Series Vol. 1, August 1914-September 1915, Appendix 132 (Ottawa, 1938), p.113.

17. War Diary, Royal Canadian Horse Artillery, 20 July 1915/20 juillet 1915, NAC/AN, RG/GE 9, Series 111-D-3, Vol. 4972, File/dossier 556-557.

18. G.W.L. Nicholson, The Gunners of Canada. The History of the Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery, vol. 1 (Toronto, 1967), passim; Colonel A. Fortescue Duguid, Official History of the Canadian Forces in The Great War 1914-1919, General Series Vol. 1, August 1914-September 1915 (Ottawa, 1938), p. 535.

19. GO 191/20.

20. GO 135/39.

21. GO 44/40.

22. G.W.L. Nicholson, The Gunners of Canada. The History of the Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery, vol. 2 (Toronto, 1972), passim.

23. GO 45/41.

24. G.W.L. Nicholson, The Gunners of Canada. The History of the Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery, vol. 2 (Toronto, 1972), passim.

25. GO 401/45.

26. GO 241/45.

27. GO 345/45.

28. GO 138/46.

29. GO 158/46. Officially, the Royal Canadian Horse Artillery still existed in the Permanent Force, thus necessitating its redesignation four months later (see footnote 4, above) / Officiellement, le « Royal Canadian Horse Artillery » existait toujours dans la Force permanente, nécessitant ainsi qu'elle soit rebaptisé quatre mois plus tard (voir la note en bas de page 4, ci-dessus).

30. Herbert Fairlie Wood, Strange Battleground. The Operations in Korea and their Effects on the Defence Policy of Canada (Ottawa, 1966), p. 273.

Footnotes notice: This content is provided as it appears in the originating document (see PDF link above) and cannot be altered. Some notes reference annotation in only one of the official languages, and therefore numbers may not match in the content you are viewing. For clarification, we invite you to check the corresponding footnote in the French page.