Volume 3, Part 1: Armour, Artillery and Field Engineer Regiments - Artillery Regiments

THE ROYAL REGIMENT OF CANADIAN ARTILLERY

The Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery Badge

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BADGE

Description

A field gun Or on a mount Vert.

Symbolism

By 1867, the 9-pounder smooth bore muzzle loader was the principal gun of Canadian artillery field batteries, the first of which were formed in 1855. This gun was also the initial equipment of "A" and "B" Batteries when they became the first full-time (regular) Militia units in 1871. The similarity to the Royal Artillery badge emphasizes the close traditional ties between the two regiments. "UBIQUE" and "QUO FAS ET GLORIA DUCUNT" are the regimental mottoes.

MOTTOES

UBIQUE (Everywhere) and
QUO FAS ET GLORIA DUCUNT (Whither right and glory lead)

MARCHES

Slow March

Royal Artillery Slow March

Quick March (dismounted parades)

British Grenadiers

Trot Past

Keel Row

Gallop Past (Horse Artillery only)

Bonnie Dundee

ALLIANCE

British Army

Royal Regiment of Artillery

BATTLE HONOURS

Honorary Distinction

The motto "UBIQUE" was granted as an honorary distinction to 'take the place of all past and future battle honours and distinctions gained in the field'.1

Home Station

Shilo, Manitoba

LINEAGE

The regiment originated on 10 August 1883, when the 'Regiment of Canadian Artillery' of the Permanent Active Militia was authorized to be formed.2 It was redesignated 'The Royal Canadian Artillery' on 24 May 1893.3 On 1 December 1898 the regiment was reorganized as two types of artillery designated the 'Royal Canadian Artillery (Field Division) and the 'Royal Canadian Artillery (Garrison Division)'.4 These divisions were redesignated the 'Royal Canadian Field Artillery' and the 'Royal Canadian Garrison Artillery' on 1 June 1901.5 On 1 September 1905 the Royal Canadian Field Artillery was redesignated the 'Royal Canadian Horse Artillery' (see the 1st Regiment, Royal Canadian Horse Artillery chart for further information).6 The previously independent Non Permanent Active Militia field and garrison artillery units were incorporated in the regiment on 28 December 1895 and provided with the suffix 'Canadian Artillery'.7 The non permanent components of the regiment were granted the suffix 'The Royal Canadian Artillery' on 3 June 1935.8 The regiment was redesignated: the 'Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery' on 29 October 1956;10 and 'The Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery' on 27 May 1997.12

Note:

The regiment is also a 'branch' within the Canadian Forces personnel structure. The 'Artillery Branch' was officially authorized on 27 August 1971.14 The units of the former corps - one of the meanings in the duality of the word "corps" as used in the Canadian Army - continued to be designated Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery, since regimental designations, including this unique one, were maintained in the Canadian Forces.

OPERATIONAL SERVICE

The North West Rebellion

'A' and 'B' Batteries of the Regiment of Canadian Artillery were placed on active service on 10 April 1885.16 The batteries provided field artillery support to Middleton's Column and the Battleford Column of the North West Field Force.17 The batteries were removed from active service on 24 July 1885.18

Note:

For additional information on the operational history of the branch consult the relevant regimental or independent battery charts.

COLOURS

A regiment or independent battery of artillery on a ceremonial parade with its guns, "is equivalent to a battalion with its Colours, and is to be saluted accordingly." 19

STANDARD OF THE ROYAL REGIMENT OF CANADIAN ARTILLERY

Artillery Branch

THE ROYAL REGIMENT OF CANADIAN ARTILLERY CAMP FLAG

Artillery Branch

ROYAL CANADIAN HORSE ARTILLERY CAMP FLAG

Artillery Branch

BADGE OF THE ROYAL CANADIAN HORSE ARTILLERY

BADGE OF THE ROYAL REGIMENT OF CANADIAN ARTILLERY ENSIGNED BY THE ROYAL ARMS OF CANADA


1. NDHQ 1065-1 (DMTH 3), 11 Aug 94 / QGFC 1065-1 (DTPM 3), 11 août 94.

2. MGO 18/83. Formed from two existing independent garrison artillery batteries of the Permanent Force authorized on the following dates: 'A Battery' at Kingston (20 October 1871), 'B Battery' at Quebec City (20 October 1871), and a third newly authorized, but not formed, 'C' Battery at Victoria (formed 6 October 1887) / Formé de deux batteries indépendantes de garnison de l'artillerie de la Force permanente autorisées selon les dates suivantes: 'A Battery' à Kingston (le 20 octobre 1871), 'B Battery' à Québec (le 20 octobre 1871) et 'C Battery', troisième batterie nouvellement autorisée mais non formée, à Victoria (formée le 6 octobre 1887).

3. Special MGO of 11 August 1893.

4. MGO 111/98.

5. GO 71/01.

6. GO 200/05.

7. GO 58/95. The regiment now consisted of the Royal Canadian Horse Artillery and Royal Canadian Garrison Artillery embodied in the Permanent Active Militia and the Canadian Field Artillery and Canadian Garrison Artillery in the Non Permanent Active Militia / Le régiment était désormais constitué de la « Royal Canadian Horse Artillery » et de la « Royal Canadian Garrison Artillery » incorporées dans la Milice active permanente et de la « Canadian Field Artillery » et de la « Canadian Garrison Artillery » incorporées dans la Milice active non permanente.

8. GO 58/35. The notation "(N.P.)" was used to distinguish references to The Royal Canadian Artillery (Non Permanent) as was necessary. The development of artillery technology kept pace with changes in warfare during the 20th Century and as a result, the regiment has at one time or another incorporated, in addition to the original field (horse, light, medium, heavy and mountain) and garrison (coastal and anti-aircraft) artillery, units assigned the role of air-defence and anti-tank. The term 'garrison artillery' is no longer used. / La notation '(N.P.)' était utilisée afin de reconnaître les références faites au « The Royal Canadian Artillery (Non Permanent), au besoin. Le développement de la technologie de l?artillerie suivait le rythme des changements dans les opérations de guerre du 20e siècle. Conséquemment, le régiment incorpora à un moment ou à un autre non seulement l'artillerie originale de campagne (à cheval, léger, moyen, lourd ou de montagne) et l'artillerie originale de garnison (côtier et anti-aérien) mais aussi des unités auxquelles furent assignées un rôle de défense aérienne et antichar-tank. Le terme « garrison artillery » n'est plus utilisé.

9. CAO 220-3, 7 février 1955.

10. CAO 76-10, Supp Issue No. 524/56.

11. CAO 220-3, 17 février 1964.

12. A/CDS minute to Comd LFC 1901-1 (DD Arty) of 30 April 1997, DHH/DHP 1325-33.

13. CDS minute to Comd LFC 1000-14-2 (CLS) 17 May 2004, DHH/DHP 1000-5 and/et 1325-33.

14. CFAO 2-10, Amendment List 35/71.

15. CFAO 2-10, Change 14/85 / OAFC 2-10, modification 14/85.

16. MGO 8/85.

17. General Sir Frederick Middleton, Suppression of the Rebellion in the North West Territories of Canada, 1885, (Toronto, 1948), pp. 22, 29 and 30; and/et Department of Militia and Defence Annual Report, 1885, Report Upon the Suppression of the Rebellion in the North-West Territories, and Matters in Connection Therewith, in 1885 (Ottawa, 1886), Appendix F, p. 49.

18. MGO 16/85.

19. Regulations and Orders for the Canadian Militia, 1870, p. 8 / Règlements et ordres pour la Milice active, 1870. p. 8.

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