Volume 3, Part 2: Infantry Regiments

THE ROYAL CANADIAN REGIMENT

The Royal Canadian Regiment Badge

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Colonel-in-Chief: His Royal Highness The Prince Philip Duke of Edinburgh KG KT OM GBE AC QSO GCL CD ADC

BADGE

Description

On an eight-pointed diamond-cut star Argent a bezant inscribed VRI, the Cypher of Queen Victoria, in letters Argent and encircled by a rope Or surmounted in chief with the Royal Crown proper.

Symbolism

The star is a customary infantry badge shape from the 19th Century. King George V granted the regiment the right to wear in perpetuity Queen Victoria's cypher "VRI" in memory of the sovereign under whose reign the regiment was raised and in view of the services the regiment rendered in the Great War.1

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MOTTO

PRO PATRIA (For my country)

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MARCHES

Quick March

"The Royal Canadian Regiment" (also titled "St. Catharines")

Slow March

"Pro Patria"

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ALLIANCE

British Army

The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers; and The Rifles

Jamaica Defence Force

The Jamaica Regiment

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BATTLE HONOURS

The War of 1812

DEFENCE OF CANADA – 1812-1815 – DÉFENSE DU CANADA; DETROIT; NIAGARA

Honorary Distinction

The non-emblazonable honorary distinction DEFENCE OF CANADA – 1812-1815 – DÉFENSE DU CANADA

North West Rebellion

SASKATCHEWAN; NORTH WEST CANADA, 1885.

South African War

PAARDEBERG; SOUTH AFRICA, 1899-1900.

The First World War

YPRES, 1915, '17; Gravenstafel; St. Julien; FESTUBERT, 1915; MOUNT SORREL; SOMME, 1916; Pozières; Flers-Courcelette; Ancre Heights; ARRAS, 1917, '18; Vimy, 1917; Arleux; Scarpe, 1917, '18; HILL 70; Passchendaele; AMIENS; Drocourt-Quéant; HINDENBURG LINE; Canal du Nord; Cambrai, 1918; PURSUIT TO MONS; FRANCE AND FLANDERS, 1915-18.

The Second World War

LANDING IN SICILY; Valguarnera; Agira; ADRANO; Regalbuto; SICILY, 1943; Landing at Reggio; Motta Montecorvino; Campobasso; Torella; San Leonardo; The Gully; Ortona; CASSINO II; Gustav Line; LIRI VALLEY; Hitler Line; GOTHIC LINE; LAMONE CROSSING; Misano Ridge; RIMINI LINE; San Martino-San Lorenzo; Pisciatello; Fosso Vecchio; ITALY, 1943-1945; Apeldoorn; NORTH-WEST EUROPE, 1945.

United Nations Operations - Korea

KOREA, 1951-1953.

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LINEAGE

This regiment originates on 14 August 1863 and incorporates both Regular and Reserve Force components.

The Royal Canadian Regiment originated on 21 December 1883, when the 'Infantry School Corps' was authorized to be formed.2 It was redesignated: 'Canadian Regiment of Infantry' on 14 May 1892;3 'The Royal Regiment of Canadian Infantry' 24 May 1893;4 'The Royal Canadian Regiment of Infantry' on 1 April 1899;5 and 'The Royal Canadian Regiment' on 1 November 1901.6 On 25 April 1958, it was amalgamated with 'The London and Oxford Fusiliers (3rd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment) (see below), retaining its designation.7

Notes:

The regiment was placed on Active Service on 6 August 1914 as part of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (GO 142/14) (see operational history below). A Permanent Active Militia component was formed on 1 April 1919 (GO 27/19) and the Canadian Expeditionary Force component of the regiment was disbanded on 30 August 1920 (GO 149/20).

On 1 March 1946, 'The Royal Canadian Regiment, CASF, CIC' was disbanded (GO 139/46) and the '2nd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment, CIC' was redesignated 'The Royal Canadian Regiment, CIC' (GO 138/46). On 27 June 1946, The Royal Canadian Regiment was embodied in the post-war Permanent Force (Active Force) (GO 158/46) (see operational history below).

On 7 August 1950, a '2nd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment, RCIC' was authorized to be formed as an Active Force unit embodied in the Special Force (CAO 110-2, Supp Issue No. 210/50). On 14 July 1952, it ceased to be embodied in the Canadian Army Special Force (CAO 76-8, Pt 'B', Supp Issue No. 293/52).

On 9 August 1950, The Royal Canadian Regiment, RCIC was redesignated 'The Royal Canadian Regiment, (1st Battalion) RCIC' (CAO 76-2, Supp Issue No. 193/50). On 1 February 1952, it was embodied in the Special Force (CAO 76-8, Pt 'B', Supp Issue No. 273/52). On 9 April 1952, it was redesignated '1st Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment, RCIC' (CAO 76-2, Pt 'B', Supp Issue No. 283/52) and on 16 May 1953, it ceased to be embodied in the Special Force (CAO 76-8, Pt 'B', Supp Issue No. 340/53).

On 9 December 1950, a '3rd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment, RCIC' was authorized to be formed as an Active Force unit embodied in the Special Force (CAO 110-2, Supp Issue No. 210/50). On 1 November 1953, it ceased to be embodied in the Canadian Army Special Force (CAO 76-8, Pt 'B', Supp Issue No. 365/53) and on 15 April 1954, it was reduced to nil strength (SD 1 Letter No. 54/30, 5 April 1954). The battalion was disbanded on 21 July 1954 (CAO 78-2, Pt 'B', Supp Issue No. 401/54).

On 6 July 1970, a '3rd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment' was authorized to be formed as a Regular Force unit (CANFORCEHED Message 1160-110/076 (DO) (DHH 73/1223, series 2, file 1050).

The '3rd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment (London and Oxford Fusiliers)' was redesignated the '4th Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment (London and Oxford Fusiliers)' on 1 September 1970 (CFOO 70/16).

On 12 August 1977, all generic titles in the Canadian Forces, such as 'battalion', were made bilingual (Memorandum, DGBB (Director General Bilingualism and Biculturalism), 1901-1/1211-7-4, 12 Aug 77).

The '4th Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment (London and Oxford Fusiliers)' was redesignated '4th Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment' on 22 May 1990 (MOO 98/90).

The London and Oxford Fusiliers (3rd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment)' originated in Woodstock, Ontario on 14 August 1863, when the '"Twenty-second Battalion Volunteer Militia Rifles, Canada" or "The Oxford Rifles"' was authorized to be formed.8 It was redesignated: '22nd Battalion "The Oxford Rifles"' on 13 April 1866;9 '22nd Regiment "The Oxford Rifles"' on 8 May 1900;10 'The Oxford Rifles' on 29 March 1920;11 '2nd (Reserve) Battalion, The Oxford Rifles' on 18 March 1942;12 and 'The Oxford Rifles' on 1 June 1945.13 On 1 October 1954, it was amalgamated with 'The Canadian Fusiliers (City of London Regiment) (Machine Gun)' (see below) and redesignated 'The London and Oxford Fusiliers (3rd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment)'.14 On 25 April 1958, it was amalgamated with 'The Royal Canadian Regiment' and redesignated the '3rd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment (London and Oxford Fusiliers)', as above.

Notes:

Upon redesignation as The Oxford Rifles on 29 March 1920 (see above), it was organized as a two battalion regiment with the 1st Battalion (71st Battalion, CEF) on the Non Permanent Active Militia order of battle, and the 2nd Battalion (168th Battalion, CEF) on the Reserve order of battle. The reserve unit was disbanded on 14 December 1936 (GO 3/37).

The Oxford Rifles were disbanded for the purpose of reorganization on 15 October 1920 and reorganized the same day (GO 253/20). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment.

The Canadian Fusiliers (City of London Regiment) (Machine Gun) originated in London, Ontario on 27 April 1866, when the '7th Battalion Infantry, "Prince Arthur's Own"' was authorized to be formed.15 It was redesignated: '7th Battalion Infantry' on 1 May 1866;16 '7th Battalion "London Light Infantry"' on 15 February 1867;17 '7th Battalion "Fusiliers"' on 16 January 1880;18 '7th Regiment "Fusiliers"' on 8 May 1900;19 'The Western Ontario Regiment' on 29 March 1920;20 and 'The Canadian Fusiliers (City of London Regiment)' on 1 August 1924.21 On 15 December 1936 it was amalgamated with the 'Headquarters' and 'A Company' of the '2nd Machine Gun Battalion, CMGC' (see below) and redesignated 'The Canadian Fusiliers (City of London Regiment) (Machine Gun)'.22 It was redesignated: '2nd (Reserve) Battalion, The Canadian Fusiliers (City of London Regiment)' on 29 January 1942;23 '2nd (Reserve) Battalion), The Canadian Fusiliers (City of London Regiment) (Machine Gun)' on 24 March 1942;24 and 'The Canadian Fusiliers (City of London Regiment) (Machine Gun)' on 1 April 1946.25 On 1 October 1954, it was amalgamated with 'The Oxford Rifles', as above.

Notes:

The 7th Battalion "Fusiliers" was disbanded for the purpose of reorganization on 3 May 1889 (GO 7/89) and reorganized on 14 June 1889 (GO 11/89). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment.

The 7th Battalion "Fusiliers' was disbanded for the purpose of reorganization on 1 February 1899 and reorganized the same day (GO 16/89). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment.

Upon redesignation as The Western Ontario Regiment on 29 March 1920 (see above), it was organized as a three battalion regiment with the 1st Battalion (1st Battalion, CEF) on the Non Permanent Active Militia order of battle, and the 2nd Battalion (33rd Battalion, CEF) and 3rd Battalion (142nd Battalion, CEF) on the Reserve order of battle. The reserve units were disbanded on 14 December 1936 (GO 3/37).

The Western Ontario Regiment was disbanded for the purpose of reorganization on 15 April 1920 and reorganized the same day (GO 65/20). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment.

The Canadian Fusiliers (City of London Regiment) was disbanded for the purpose of amalgamation on 14 December 1936 and reorganized the next day (GO 146/36). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment.

The '2nd Machine Gun Battalion, CMGC' originated in London, Ontario on 1 June 1919, when the '2nd Machine Gun Brigade, CMGC' was authorized to be formed.26 It was redesignated the '2nd Machine Gun Battalion, CMGC' on 15 September 1924.27 On 15 December 1936, it was amalgamated with 'The Canadian Fusiliers (City of London Regiment)', as above.

Notes:

The 2nd Machine Gun Brigade, CMGC was authorized a Reserve order of battle counterpart on 1 June 1919 (GO 104/20). The reserve unit was disbanded on 14 December 1936 (GO 3/37).

The 2nd Machine Gun Battalion, CMGC was disbanded for the purpose of amalgamation on 14 December 1936 and reorganized the next day (GO 148/36). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment.

On 15 December 1936, 'The Kent Regiment' (now 'The Essex and Kent Regiment') amalgamated with "B" Company", 2nd Machine Gun Battalion, CMGC' and 'The Perth Regiment' amalgamated with "C" Company, 2nd Machine Gun Battalion, CMGC' (GO 148/36).The perpetuation of the 2nd Machine Gun Battalion, CMGC (1919-1936) was assigned to The Canadian Fusiliers (City of London Regiment) (Machine Gun) (GO 76/37).

Perpetuations

‘The Loyal London Volunteers’, ‘1st Regiment of Middlesex Militia (1812-15)’, ‘1st Regiment of Oxford Militia (1812-15)’, '1st', '33rd', '71s't, '142nd' and '168th "Overseas" Battalions, CEF'; and '2nd Battalion, CMGC, CEF'

Headquarters Location

1st Battalion: Petawawa, Ontario
2nd Battalion: Gagetown, New Brunswick
3rd Battalion: Petawawa, Ontario
4th Battalion: London, Ontario

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OPERATIONAL HISTORY

The Fenian Raids

The 7th Battalion Infantry was called out on active service on 1 June 1866. The battalion served on the St. Clair frontier and was removed from active service on 22 June 1866.28

The 22nd Battalion, "Oxford Rifles" was called out on active service on 1 June 1866. The battalion served on the St. Clair frontier and was removed from active service on 22 June 1866.29

Two companies of the 7th Battalion "London Light Infantry" were called out on active service on 12 April 1870. They served on the St. Clair frontier and were removed from active service on 21 April 1870.30

North West Rebellion

The Infantry School Corps mobilized "C" Company for active service on 10 April 1885.31 Half of the company served with Middleton's Column, the other half-company with the Battleford Column, of the North West Field Force.32

The 7th Battalion "Fusiliers" was mobilized for active service on 10 April 1885.33 It served as part of the Alberta Column of the North West Field Force.34 The battalion was removed from active service on 24 July 1885.35

South African War

On 14 October 1899, eight companies of infantry were authorized to be formed for active service in South Africa.36 These companies were taken on strength of the 'Royal Canadian Regiment of Infantry' on 20 October 1899,37 and designated the '2nd (Special Service) Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment of Infantry' on 27 October 1899.38 The battalion embarked for Africa on 30 October 1899,39 where it fought as part of the '19th Brigade, IX Division'.40 The overseas battalion was disbanded on 31 December 1900.41

On 5 March 1900, a 'Provisional Battalion of Infantry' was authorized to be formed for active service at Halifax, Nova Scotia.42 It was redesignated the '3rd (Special Service) Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment of Infantry' on 31 March 1900.43 The unit served in a garrison role at Halifax and Esquimalt, British Columbia.44 The battalion was disbanded on 1 October 1902.45

The 7th Battalion "Fusiliers" contributed volunteers for the Canadian Contingents during the South African War.46

The First World War

The Royal Canadian Regiment, which was placed on active service on 6 August 1914,47 embarked for Bermuda for garrison duty on 10 September 1914.48 The regiment embarked for Great Britain, via Halifax, on 26 August 1915.49 On 1 November 1915 it disembarked in France, where it fought as part of the 7th Infantry Brigade, 3rd Canadian Division in France and Flanders until the end of the war.50 The overseas component of the regiment was disbanded on 15 September 1920.51

Details of the 7th Regiment "Fusiliers" were placed on active service on 6 August 1914 for local protection duties.52

Details of the 22nd Regiment "The Oxford Rifles" were placed on active service on 6 August 1914 for local protection duties.53

The 1st Battalion, which was authorized on 10 August 1914 as the '1st Battalion, CEF',54 embarked for Great Britain on 26 September 1914.55 It disembarked in France on 12 February 1915, where it fought as part of the 1st Infantry Brigade, 1st Canadian Division in France and Flanders until the end of the war.56 The battalion was disbanded on 15 September 1920.57

The 33rd Battalion, which was authorized on 7 November 1914 as the '33rd Battalion', CEF,58 embarked for Great Britain on 1 April 1916.59 It was redesignated the '33rd Reserve Battalion, CEF' on 6 April 1916 and it provided reinforcements for the Canadian Corps in the field until 6 July 1916, when its personnel were absorbed by the '36th "Overseas" Battalion, CEF'.60 The battalion was disbanded on 17 July 1917.61

The 71st Battalion, which was authorized on 1 April 1916 as the '71st "Overseas" Infantry Battalion', CEF,62 embarked for Great Britain on 1 April 1916.63 It provided reinforcements to the Canadian Corps in the field until 30 September 1916, when its personnel were absorbed by the '44th', '54th' and '74th "Overseas" Battalion(s), CEF'.64 The battalion was disbanded on 11 April 1918.65

The 142nd Battalion, which was authorized on 22 December 1915 as the '142nd "Overseas" Battalion', CEF,66 embarked for Great Britain on 31 October 1916.67 On 12 November 1916, its personnel were absorbed by the '23rd Reserve Battalion, CEF' to provide reinforcements for the Canadian Corps in the field.68 The battalion was disbanded on 27 July 1917.69

The 168th Battalion, which was authorized on 22 December 1915 as the '168th "Overseas" Battalion', CEF,70 embarked for Great Britain on 30 October 1916.71 On 4 January 1917, its personnel were absorbed by the '4th Reserve Battalion, CEF' and the '6th Reserve Battalion, CEF' to provide reinforcements for the Canadian Corps in the field.72 The battalion was disbanded on 4 April 1918.73

The '2nd Battalion, CMGC, CEF', which was organized in France, was authorized on 21 March 1918.74 It provided machine gun support to the 2nd Canadian Division in France and Flanders until the end of the war.75 The battalion was disbanded on 15 November 1920.76

The Second World War

The Royal Canadian Regiment was placed on active service on 1 September 1939, under the designation 'The Royal Canadian Regiment, CASF'.77 It embarked for Great Britain on 18 December 1939, and on 14 June 1940 it went to France as part of the Second British Expeditionary Force, reaching a point beyond Laval before being ordered back.78 It landed in Sicily on 10 July 1943 and in Italy on 3 September 1943 as part of the 1st Infantry Brigade, 1st Canadian Infantry Division.79 On 9 March 1945 the regiment moved with the 1st Canadian Corps to North West Europe, where it fought until the end of the war.80 The overseas regiment was disbanded on 1 March 1946.81

On 1 June 1945, a second Active Force component of the regiment was mobilized for service in the Pacific theatre of operations, under the designation '1st Canadian Infantry Battalion (The Royal Canadian Regiment), CASF'.82 It was redesignated: '2nd Battalion The Royal Canadian Regiment, CIC' on 2 September 1945;83 and 'The Royal Canadian Regiment, CIC' on 1 March 1946.84 On 27 June 1946, it was embodied in the Permanent Force as the 'The Royal Canadian Regiment'.85

The Canadian Fusiliers mobilized the '1st Battalion, The Canadian Fusiliers (City of London Regiment), CASF' for active service on 29 January 1942.86 It served in Canada in a home defence role as part of Pacific Command;87 and took part in the expedition to Kiska, Alaska as a component of the 13th Canadian Infantry Brigade Group, serving there from 16 August 1943 to 22 December 1943.88 It embarked for Britain on 28 May 1944.89 On 1 November 1944, it was redesignated the '2nd Canadian Infantry Training Battalion, Type A (Canadian Fusiliers), CASF'.90 The overseas battalion was disbanded on 10 August 1945.91

The Oxford Rifles mobilized the '1st Battalion, The Oxford Rifles, CASF' for active service on 18 March 1942.92 It served in Canada in a home defence role as part of the 16th Infantry Brigade, 8th Canadian Division.93 On 2 January 1945, it embarked for Britain where it was disbanded on 10 January 1945.94

United Nations Operations - Korea

Three battalions of The Royal Canadian Regiment served in Korea as part of the 25th Canadian Infantry Brigade Group, 1st Commonwealth Division. The 2nd Battalion was the first to arrive in Korea (5 May 1951 to 25 April 1952), followed by the 1st Battalion (20 April 1952 to 25 March 1953) then the 3rd Battalion (23 March 1953 to the end of the conflict).95

The Gulf War

'C' Company of the 1st Battalion served in Al Jabail, Saudi Arabia providing security for '1 Canadian Field Hospital' and prisoner of war processing from 21 February to 20 March 1991. 12 Platoon, 'P' Company of the 3rd Battalion served in Bahrain as a security force from 16 January to the end of March 1991.96

REGIMENTAL COLOUR

The Royal Canadian Regiment

CAMP FLAG

The Royal Canadian Regiment


1. GO 53/19.

2. MGO 26/83. Established with three 'Schools of Infantry' formed into one corps at: Fredericton, New Brunswick; Saint- Jean, Quebec; and Toronto, Ontario. On 25 January 1884, the companies forming the schools were designated 'A Company' at Fredericton; 'B Company' at Saint-Jean; and 'C Company' at Toronto (MGO 3/84). On 15 July 1887 they were designated 'Royal School(s) of Infantry' (MGO 13/87) / Il regroupe trois écoles d'instruction d'infanterie formées en un corps, établies à : Fredericton, au Nouveau-Brunswick; Saint-Jean, au Québec; et Toronto, en Ontario. Le 25 janvier 1884, les compagnies qui sont formées les écoles furent baptisées : « A Company » à Fredericton, « B Company » à Saint-Jean; et « C Company » à Toronto (MGO 3/84). Le 15 juillet 1887, elles sont baptisées « Royal School(s) of Infantry » (MGO 13/87).

3. GO 16/92.

4. Special General Order of 11 Aug 1893 / Ordre général spécial de 11 août 1893.

5. GO 31/99.

6. GO 139/01.

7. CAO 76-3, Pt 'B', Supp Issue No. 604/58.

8. MGO 14 Aug 63. Formed from six independent rifle and infantry companies authorized on the following dates: 'No. 1 Company' (The 1st Volunteer Militia Rifle Company of Woodstock, 8 May 1856), 'No. 2 Company (Highland)' (Volunteer Highland Rifle Company at Embro, 22 January 1862), 'No. 3 Company' (Volunteer Militia Company of Rifles at Beachville, 26 December 1862), 'No. 4 Company' (Volunteer Militia Company of Rifles at Wolverton, 16 January 1863), 'No. 5 Company' (Volunteer Militia Company of Infantry in the township of North Oxford, 23 January 1863), and 'No. 6 Company' (Volunteer Militia Company of Rifles at Princeton, 23 January 1863) / Formé de six compagnies de voltigeurs et d'infanterie indépendante autorisées selon les dates suivantes : « No. 1 Company » (The 1st Volunteer Militia Rifle Company of Woodstock, 8 mai 1856), « No. 2 Company (Highland) » (Volunteer Highland Rifle Company at Embro, 22 janvier 1862), « No. 3 Company » (Volunteer Militia Company of Rifles at Beachville, 26 décembre 1862), « No. 4 Company » (Volunteer Militia Company of Rifles at Wolverton, 16 janvier 1863), « No. 5 Company » (Volunteer Militia Company of Infantry in the township of North Oxford, 23 janvier 1863), et « No. 6 Company » (Volunteer Militia Company of Rifles at Princeton, 23 janvier 1863).

9. MGO 13 Apr 66.

10. MO 105/1900.

11. MO 94/20.

12. GO 42/41; and/et GO 147/42.

13. GO 264/45.

14. CAO 76-3, Pt 'B', Supp Issue No. 417/54.

15. GO 27 Apr 66. Formed from six independent artillery, rifle and infantry companies authorized on the following dates: 'No. 1 Company' (Volunteer Militia Foot Artillery Company at London, 22 January 1862), 'No. 2 Company' (2nd Volunteer Militia Company of Infantry London, 23 January 1863), 'No. 3 Company' (The Merchants Volunteer Rifle Company of London, 26 December 1862), 'No. 4 Company' (Volunteer Rifle Company at London, 24 March 1865), 'No. 5 Company' (The London Highland Volunteer Rifle Company, 7 August 1856), and 'No. 6 Company' (2d Volunteer Militia Rifle Company of London, 20 March 1856) / Formé de six compagnies d'artillerie, de voltigeurs et d'infanterie indépendante autorisées selon les dates suivantes : « No. 1 Company » (Volunteer Militia Foot Artillery Company at London, 22 janvier 1862), « No. 2 Company » (2nd Volunteer Militia Company of Infantry London, 23 janvier 1863), « No. 3 Company » (The Merchants Volunteer Rifle Company of London, 26 décembre 1862), « No. 4 Company » (Volunteer Rifle Company at London, 24 mars 1865), « No. 5 Company » (The London Highland Volunteer Rifle Company, 7 août 1856), et « No. 6 Company » (2d Volunteer Militia Rifle Company of London, 20 mars 1856).

16. MGO 1 May 66.

17. MGO 15 Feb 67.

18. MGO 1/80.

19. MO 105/1900.

20. MO 94/20.

21. GO 103/24.

22. GO 146/36; and/et GO 148/36.

23. GO 42/41; and/et GO 73/42.

24. GO 128/42.

25. GO 116/46; and/et GO 161/46.

26. GO 47/19; and/et GO 1/20.

27. GO 117/24.

28. MGO 1 June 66; and/et MGO 22 June 66.

29. Ibid.

30. Adjutant General of the Militia Annual Report reprinted in Report of the State of the Militia of the Dominion of Canada for the Year 1870 (Ottawa, 1871), passim.

31. MGO 8/85.

32. General Sir Frederick Middleton, Suppression of the Rebellion in the North West Territories of Canada 1885, (Toronto, 1948), pp. 22, 29 and/et 30.

33. MGO 8/85.

34. General Sir Frederick Middleton, Suppression of the Rebellion in the North West Territories of Canada 1885, (Toronto, 1948), p. 42.

35. MGO 16/85.

36. MO 211/99.

37. MO 215/99. "A" Company raised in British Columbia and Manitoba; "B" Company raised at London; "C" Company raised at Toronto; "D" Company raised at Ottawa and Kingston; "E" Company raised at Montreal; "F" Company raised at Quebec; "G" Company raised in New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island; and "H" Company raised in Nova Scotia / Compagnie « A » fut recruté en Colombie-Britannique et en Alberta; compagnie « B » fut recruté à London; compagnie « C » fut recruté à Toronto; compagnie « D » fut recruté à Ottawa et Kingston; compagnie « E » fut recruté à Montréal; compagnie « F » fut recruté à Québec; compagnie « G » fut recruté au Nouveau-Brunswick et à l'Île-du-Prince-Édouard; et compagnie « H » fut recruté en Nouvelle-Écosse.

38. MO 221/99.

39. MO 222/99.

40. MO 74/1900; MO 80/1900; and/et MO 175/1900.

41. MO 298/1900.

42. MO 52/1900.

43. MO 75/1900; and/et GO 5/01.

44. MO 60/1900. Half of "A" Company served in Esquimalt, British Columbia / La moitié de la compagnie « A » servit à Esquimalt, en Colombie-Britannique.

45. GO 107/1902.

46. GO 60/33.

47. GO 142/14. On 6 August 1914, all Permanent Active Militia corps were called out on service / Le 6 août 1914, toutes les corps de la Milice active permanente furent mobilisés pour le service actif.

48. Colonel A.F. Duguid, Official History of the Canadian Forces in the Great War, 1914-1919, Volume 1, Appendices and Maps (Ottawa, 1938), p. 368.

49. Ibid.

50. War Diary/Journaux de guerre, The Royal Canadian Regiment, LAC/BAC, RG/GE 9, Series III-D-3, Vol. 4910, File/dossier 343; and/et R. C. Fetherstonhaugh, The Royal Canadian Regiment, 1883-1933, (Montreal, 1936), pp. 213-376.

51. GO 149/20.

52. GO 142/14.

53. GO 163/14.

54. PC 2067, 6 August 1914; and/et memorandum Preliminary Instructions for Mobn. War 1914, BGen V.A.S. Williams, Adjutant-General, Canadian Militia to O.Cs. Divisions and Districts, 10 August 1914, reprinted in Colonel A.F. Duguid, Official History of the Canadian Forces in the Great War, 1914-1919, vol. 1 - Appendices and Maps (Ottawa, 1938), pp. 37-39.

55. Ibid., pp. 111 and/et 116.

56. Ibid., p. 454; and/et War Diary/Journaux de guerre, 1st Canadian Infantry Battalion, LAC/BAC, RG/GE 9, Series III-D-3, Vol. 4912-13, File/dossier 350-352.

57. GO 149/20.

58. GO 86/15.

59. CEF Sailing List, vol. III. The battalion also sent two reinforcement drafts to England; on 17 July 1915 and 17 August 1915 / Le bataillon envoya également deux contingents de renforts en Angleterre les 17 juillet 1915 et 17 août 1915.

60. Edwin Pye Papers, Summary of History of C.E.F. Units - 33rd Battalion, Document Collection/Collection de documents 74/672, Series/séries IV, Box/boîte 11, Folder/chemise 33.

61. GO 82/18.

62. GO 103a/15.

63. CEF Sailing List, vol. IV. The Battalion also sent a reinforcement draft to England on 20 November 1915 / Le régiment envoya également un contingent de renforts en Angleterre le 20 novembre 1915.

64. Edwin Pye Papers, Summary of History of C.E.F. Units - 71st Battalion, Document Collection/Collection de documents 74/672, Series/séries IV, Box/boîte 12, Folder/chemise 71.

65. GO 82/18.

66. GO 151/15.

67. CEF Sailing List, vol. VIII.

68. Edwin Pye Papers, Summary of History of C.E.F. Units - 142nd Battalion, Document Collection/Collection de documents 74/672, Series/séries IV, Box/boîte 13, Folder/chemise 142.

69. GO 89/17.

70. GO 151/15.

71. CEF Sailing List, vol. VIII.

72. Edwin Pye Papers, Summary of History of C.E.F. Units - 168th Battalion, Document Collection/Collection de documents 74/672, Series/séries IV, Box/boîte 13, Folder/chemise 168.

73. GO 60/18.

74. War Diary/Journaux de guerre, 2nd Canadian Machine Gun Battalion, LAC/BAC, RG/GE 9, Series III-D-3, Vol. 4985, File/dossier 621, Summary (March), p. 18, (Canadian Corps letter A.29.1.34 dated 18 February/février 1918, [RG 9 vol. 4020 folder/fiche 47 file/dossier 3]). The battalion was formed from the '4th', '5th', '6th' and '14th Canadian Machine Gun Company, CEF / Le bataillon fut formé à partir des « 4th », « 5th », « 6th » et « 14th Canadian Machine Gun Company, CEF ».

75. G.W.L. Nicholson, Official History of the Canadian Army in the First World War, Canadian Expeditionary Force 1914-1919 (Ottawa, 1962), pp. 430, 449 and/et 459.

76. GO 209/20.

77. GO 135/39. On 1 September 1939, all corps, units and detachments of the Permanent Force were embodied in the Canadian Active Service Force / Le 1er septembre 1939, tous les corps, unités et détachements de la Force permanente furent incorporés dans l'armée active du Canada.

78. G.R. Stevens, The Royal Canadian Regiment, 1933-1966, (London, 1967), pp. 16 and/et 24-25.

79. Lieutenant-Colonel G.W.L. Nicholson, The Canadians in Italy, 1943-45, (Ottawa, 1957), passim.

80. G.R. Stevens, The Royal Canadian Regiment, 1933-1966, (London, 1967), pp. 184-185.

81. GO 139/46.

82. GO 241/45. The Canadian units formed for the Pacific theatre of operations were organized and equipped the same as the American army. The unit was part of the '1st Canadian Infantry Regiment' / Les unités canadiennes du théâtre des opérations du Pacifique furent organisées et équipées de la même façon que l'Armée américaine. L'unité servit en tant que composante du « 1st Canadian Infantry Regiment ».

83. GO 378/45.

84. GO 138/46.

85. GO 158/46.

86. GO 42/41; and/et GO 75/42.

87. Colonel C.P. Stacey, Official History of the Canadian Army in the Second World War, Volume 1, Six Years of War (Ottawa, 1955), p. 538.

88. Ibid, pp. 502-505. Upon landing, the Japanese were found to have previously evacuated the island / Lors du débarquement, l'on découvrit que les Japonais avaient déjà quitté l'île.

89. G.R. Stevens, The Royal Canadian Regiment, 1933-1966, (London, 1967), p. 291.

90. GO 78/45.

91. GO 388/45.

92. GO 147/42.

93. Colonel C.P. Stacey, Official History of the Canadian Army in the Second World War, Volume 1, Six Years of War (Ottawa, 1955), p. 539.

94. GO 114/45.

95. Lieutenant-Colonel Herbert Fairlie Wood, Strange Battleground, (Ottawa, 1966), passim.

96. 1st Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment, AHR 1991, file 1325-2 (IO), 21 April 1992, in AHR file 1847; 3rd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment, AHR 1991, file 1325-2 (IO), 1 March 1992, in AHR file 1576; and/et Major Jean H. Morin and Lieutenant Commander Richard H. Gimblett, Operation Friction, (Toronto, 1997), pp. 108, 153, 155 and/et 227. 'M' Company of the 3rd Battalion served in Doha, Qatar providing airfield security, prior to the war, from 5 October to 24 December 1990 / La compagnie « M » du 3e Bataillon servit à Doha, au Quatar en charge de la protection des aérodromes, avant la guerre, du 5 octobre au 24 décembre 1990.

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