Volume 3, Part 2: Infantry Regiments

THE HASTINGS AND PRINCE EDWARD REGIMENT

The Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment Badge

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Colonel-in-Chief: His Royal Highness The Prince Edward The Earl of Wessex KG KCVO SOM ADC

BADGE

Description

Azure a stag's head on a torse Or all within an annulus inscribed HASTINGS and PRINCE EDWARD REGIMENT and resting on a scroll inscribed PARATUS, all Gules edged and inscribed Or, the whole surmounting a cross pattee Or ensigned by the Royal Crown proper and environed by a wreath of maple leaves issuant from in base a beaver couchant on a log Or.

Symbolism

The nine maple leaves on each side, which was the number of Canadian provinces when the regiment was formed in 1920, and the beaver (from the badge of the former 16th Prince Edward Regiment) represent service to Canada, and the crown, service to the Sovereign. The cross commemorates the former 49th Regiment "Hastings Rifles", as does the stag's head, which is a symbol of the region in which the regiment is based. The royal blue is the official facing colour of the regiment, the gold represents both the brass origins of the equipment badge and the other regimental colour adopted in 1934 with the alliance with The Royal Sussex Regiment of the British Army - now, through amalgamation, The Princess of Wales's Royal Regiment. The scarlet (or red) commemorates the regiment's service with the 1st Canadian Division in both world wars and is the traditional colour of the army and the infantry in particular. "HASTINGS and PRINCE EDWARD REGIMENT" is a form of the regimental title, and "PARATUS" is the motto of the regiment.

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MOTTO

PARATUS (Prepared)

MARCH

"I'm Ninety-Five"

ALLIANCE

British Army

The Princess of Wales's Royal Regiment

BATTLE HONOURS

The War of 1812

Honorary Distinction

The non-emblazonable honorary distinction DEFENCE OF CANADA – 1812-1815 – DÉFENSE DU CANADA

North West Rebellion

NORTH WEST CANADA, 1885.

The First World War

MOUNT SORREL; SOMME, 1916; ARRAS, 1917, '18; HILL 70; YPRES, 1917; AMIENS; HINDENBURG LINE; PURSUIT TO MONS.

The Second World War

LANDING IN SICILY; Grammichelle; Valguarnera; Assoro; Agira; ADRANO; Regalbuto; SICILY, 1943; Landing at Reggio; Motta Montecorvino; Campobasso; Torella; The Moro; San Leonardo; The Gully; Ortona; CASSINO II; Gustav Line; LIRI VALLEY; Hitler Line; GOTHIC LINE; LAMONE CROSSING; Misano Ridge; RIMINI LINE; San Fortunato; Bulgaria Village; Naviglio Canal; Fosso Vecchio; ITALY, 1943-1945; Apeldoorn; NORTH-WEST EUROPE, 1945.

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LINEAGE

This Reserve Force regiment originated on 16 January 1863 and incorporates the following regiments and artillery battery.

The Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment originated in Belleville, Ontario on 16 January 1863, when 'The 15th Battalion Volunteer Militia (Infantry) Canada' was authorized to be formed.1 It was redesignated: '15th Battalion or the Argyll Light Infantry' on 2 June 1871;2 '15th Regiment "Argyll Light Infantry"' on 8 May 1900;3 'The Argyll Light Infantry' on 12 March 1920;4 'The Argyll Light Infantry (Tank)' on 15 December 1936;5 and 'The (Reserve) Argyll Light Infantry (Tank)' on 7 November 1940.6 On 1 April 1946, it was amalgamated with the '44th (Reserve) Field Regiment, RCA' (see below), converted to artillery, and redesignated the '9th Anti- Tank Regiment (Self-Propelled) (Argyll Light Infantry), RCA'.7 On 1 September 1954, it was amalgamated with the '34th Anti-Tank Battery (Self Propelled), RCA' (see below), 'The Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment' (see below) and 'The Midland Regiment' (see below), converted to infantry, and redesignated 'The Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment'.8

Notes:

Upon redesignation as The Argyll Light Infantry on 12 March 1920 (see above), it was organized as a two battalion regiment with the 1st Battalion (155th Battalion, CEF) on the Non Permanent Active Militia order of battle, and the 2nd Battalion (no CEF designation) on the Reserve order of battle. The reserve unit was disbanded on 14 December 1936 (GO 3/37).

The Argyll Light Infantry was disbanded for the purpose of reorganization on 20 March 1920 and reorganized the same day (GO 53/20). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment.

The Argyll Light Infantry was disbanded for the purpose of reorganization on 14 December 1936 and reorganized the next day (GO 188/36). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment.

The 44th (Reserve) Field Regiment, RCA originated in Gananoque, Ontario on 1 June 1905, when the '9th Brigade, CFA' was authorized to be formed.9 It was redesignated: '9th Field Brigade, CA' on 1 July 1925;10 '9th Field Brigade, RCA' on 3 June 1935;11 '9th (Reserve) Field Brigade, RCA' on 7 November 1940;12 and '44th (Reserve) Field Regiment, RCA' on 24 June 1942.13 On 1 April 1946, it was amalgamated with 'The (Reserve) Argyll Light Infantry (Tank)', as above.

Notes:

The 9th Brigade, CFA was authorized a Reserve order of battle counterpart on 1 November 1920 (GO 186/20). The reserve unit was disbanded on 14 December 1936 (GO 3/37).

The 9th Brigade, CFA was disbanded for the purpose of reorganization on 15 February 1921 and reorganized the same day (GO 92/21). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the brigade.

No lineal connection with the '44th Field Regiment, RCA' formed in St. Catharines, Ontario on 1 April 1946, and transferred to the Supplementary Order of Battle in 1965.

The 34th Anti-Tank Battery (Self-Propelled), RCA originated in Belleville, Ontario on 1 April 1912, when the '34th Battery, CFA' was authorized to be formed.14 It was redesignated: '34th Field Battery, CA' on 1 July 1925;15 '34th Field Battery, RCA on 3 June 1935;16 '34th (Reserve) Field Battery, RCA' on 7 November 1940;17 and '34th Anti-Tank Battery (Self- Propelled), RCA' on 1 April 1946.18 On 1 September 1954, it was amalgamated with the '9th Anti-Tank Regiment (Self Propelled), RCA', 'The Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment' and 'The Midland Regiment', as above.

Note:

The 34th Battery, CFA was disbanded for the purpose of reorganization on 1 October 1920 and reorganized the same day (GO 231/20). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the battery.

The Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment originated in Picton, Ontario on 6 February 1863, when the '16th Battalion Volunteer Militia (Infantry) Canada' was authorized to be formed.19 It was redesignated: '16th "Prince Edward" Battalion of Infantry' on 30 November 1866;20 and '16th Prince Edward Regiment' on 8 May 1900.21 On 12 March 1920, it was amalgamated with the '49th Regiment "Hastings Rifles"' (see below) to form 'The Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment'.22 It was redesignated: '2nd (Reserve) Battalion, The Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment' on 7 November 1940;23 and 'The Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment' on 1 November 1945.24 On 1 September 1954, it was amalgamated with the '9th Anti-Tank Regiment (Self Propelled), RCA', '34th Anti- Tank Battery (Self Propelled), RCA' and 'The Midland Regiment', retaining its designation, as above.

Notes:

The 16th Prince Edward Regiment was disbanded for the purpose of reorganization on 2 December 1913 and reorganized the next day (GO 196/13). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment.

Upon redesignation as The Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment on 12 March 1920 (see above), it was organized as a three battalion regiment with the 1st Battalion (39th Battalion, CEF) on the Non Permanent Active Militia order of battle, and the 2nd Battalion (80th Battalion, CEF) and 3rd Battalion (254th Battalion, CEF) on the Reserve order of battle. The reserve units were disbanded on 14 December 1936 (GO 3/37).

The Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment was disbanded for the purpose of reorganization on 1 October 1920 and reorganized the same day (GO 232/20). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment.

On 4 May 1951, the regiment mobilized two temporary Active Force companies designated "E" and "F" (CAO 110-2, Pt 'B', Supp Issue No. 245/51 and SD 1 Letter No. 4237, 5 May 1951). "E" Company was reduced to nil strength upon its personnel being incorporated into the '1st Canadian Infantry Battalion' for service in Germany with the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (SD 1 Letter No. 4365, 12 November 1951). It was disbanded on 29 July 1953 (CAO 78-2, Pt 'B', Supp Issue No. 352/53). "F" Company was initially used as a reinforcement pool for "E" Company. On 15 May 1952, it was reduced to nil strength, upon its personnel being absorbed by the newly formed '2nd Canadian Infantry Battalion' for service in Korea with the United Nations (SD 1 Letter No. 4452, 22 April 1952 and CAO 110-2, Pt 'B', Supp Issue No. 283/52). "F" Company was disbanded on 29 July 1953 (CAO 78-2, Pt 'B', Supp Issue No. 352/53).

The 49th Regiment "Hastings Rifles" originated in Stirling, Ontario on 14 September 1866, when the '49th "Hastings" Battalion of Infantry' was authorized to be formed.25 It was redesignated: '49th "Hastings" Battalion of Rifles' on 6 April 1871;26 and '49th Regiment "Hastings Rifles"' on 8 May 1900.27 On 12 March 1920, it was amalgamated with the '16th Prince Edward Regiment', as above.

The Midland Regiment originated in Cobourg, Ontario on 5 October 1866, when the '40th "Northumberland Battalion of Infantry"' was authorized to be formed.28 It was redesignated: '40th Northumberland Regiment' on 8 May 1900;29 'The Northumberland (Ontario) Regiment' on 12 March 1920;30 and 'The Northumberland Regiment' on 15 May 1924.31 On 15 December 1936, it was amalgamated with 'The Durham Regiment' (see below) and redesignated 'The Midland Regiment (Northumberland and Durham)'.32 It was redesignated: '2nd (Reserve) Battalion, The Midland Regiment (Northumberland and Durham)' on 7 November 1940;33 'The Midland Regiment (Northumberland and Durham)' on 1 June 1945;34 and 'The Midland Regiment' on 1 April 1946.35 On 1 September 1954, it was amalgamated with the '9th Anti-Tank Regiment (Self Propelled), RCA', '34th Anti-Tank Battery (Self Propelled), RCA' and 'The Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment', as above.

Notes:

Upon redesignation as The Northumberland (Ontario) Regiment on 12 March 1920 (see above), it was organized as a two battalion regiment with the 1st Battalion (139th Battalion, CEF) on the Non Permanent Active Militia order of battle, and the 2nd Battalion (235th Battalion, CEF) on the Reserve order of battle.

The Northumberland (Ontario) Regiment was disbanded for the purpose of reorganization on 15 September 1920 and reorganized the same day (GO 204/20). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment.

On 15 November 1926, the battalions were redesignated the 1st Battalion (39th Battalion, CEF) and 2nd Battalion (139th Battalion, CEF) (GO 75/26). The reserve unit was disbanded on 14 December 1936 (GO 3/37).

The Northumberland Regiment was disbanded for the purpose of amalgamated on 14 December 1936 and reorganized the next day (GO 212/36). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment.

The Durham Regiment originated in Port Hope, Ontario on 16 November 1866, when the '46th "East Durham" Battalion of Infantry' was authorized to be formed.36 It was redesignated: '46th "Durham" Battalion of Infantry' on 1 August 1897;37 '46th Durham Regiment' on 8 May 1900;38 and 'The Durham Regiment' on 12 March 1920.39 On 15 December 1936, it was amalgamated with 'The Northumberland Regiment', as above.

Notes:

Upon redesignation as The Durham Regiment on 12 March 1920 (see above), it was organized as a two battalion regiment with the 1st Battalion (136th Battalion, CEF) on the Non Permanent Active Militia order of battle, and the 2nd Battalion (no CEF designation) on the Reserve order of battle. The reserve unit was disbanded on 14 December 1936 (GO 3/37).

The Durham Regiment was disbanded for the purpose of reorganization on 15 February 1921 and reorganized the same day (GO 118/21). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment.

The Durham Regiment was disbanded for the purpose of amalgamation on 14 December 1936 and reorganized the next day (GO 212/36). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment.

Perpetuations

‘1st Regiment of Durham Militia (1812-15)’, ‘1st Regiment of Hastings Militia (1812-15)’, ‘1st Regiment of Northumberland Militia (1812-15)’, ‘1st Regiment of Prince Edward Militia (1812-15)’, '9th Brigade, CFA, CEF; and '39th', '80th', '136th', '139th', '155th' and '254th "Overseas" Battalion(s), CEF'

Headquarters Location

Belleville, Ontario

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OPERATIONAL HISTORY

The Fenian Raids

The 15th Battalion Volunteer Militia (Infantry), Canada was called out on active service on 8 March 1866.40 It was removed from active service on 27 March 1866.41

North West Rebellion

The 15th Battalion "Argyll Light Infantry" mobilized a company for active service with 'The "Midland" Battalion' on 10 April 1885.42 It served in the Alberta Column of the North West Field Force.43 The company was removed from active service on 24 July 1885.44

The 40th "Northumberland Battalion of Infantry" mobilized a company for active service with 'The "Midland" Battalion' on 10 April 1885.45 It served in the Alberta Column of the North West Field Force.46 The company was removed from active service on 24 July 1885.47

The 46th "East Durham" Battalion of Infantry mobilized two companies for active service with 'The "Midland" Battalion' on 10 April 1885.48 They served in the Alberta Column of the North West Field Force.49 The battalion was removed from active service on 24 July 1885.50

The 49th "Hastings" Battalion of Rifles mobilized a company for active service with 'The "Midland" Battalion' on 10 April 1885.51 It served in the Alberta Column of the North West Field Force.52 The company was removed from active service on 24 July 1885.53

The First World War

The 9th Brigade, which was authorized on 20 January 1916 as the '9th Brigade, CFA, CEF',54 embarked for Great Britain on 15 February 1916.55 It disembarked in France on 14 July 1916,56 where it provided field artillery support as part of the 3rd Canadian Divisional Artillery in France and Flanders until the end of the war.57 The brigade was disbanded on 1 November 1920.58

The 39th Battalion which was authorized on 7 November 1914 as the '39th Battalion, CEF',59 embarked for Great Britain on 17 June 1915.60 It provided reinforcements to the Canadian Corps in the field until 4 January 1917, when its personnel were absorbed by the '6th Reserve Battalion, CEF'.61 The battalion was disbanded on 17 July 1917.62

The 80th Battalion, which was authorized on 10 July 1915 as the '80th "Overseas" Battalion, CEF',63 embarked for Great Britain on 20 May 1916.64 It provided reinforcements to the Canadian Corps in the field until 30 September 1916, when its personnel were absorbed by units of the 4th Canadian Division.65 The battalion was disbanded on 17 July 1917.66

The 136th Battalion, which was authorized on 22 December 1915 as the '136th "Overseas" Battalion, CEF',67 embarked for Great Britain on 25 September 1916.68 Its personnel were absorbed by the '39th Reserve Battalion, CEF' on 6 October 1916 to provide reinforcements to the Canadian Corps in the field.69 The battalion was disbanded on 22 May 1917.70

The 139th Battalion, which was authorized on 22 December 1915 as the '139th "Overseas" Battalion, CEF',71 embarked for Great Britain on 27 September 1916.72 Its personnel were absorbed by the '36th Reserve Battalion, CEF' on 6 October 1916 to provide reinforcements to the Canadian Corps in the field.73 The battalion was disbanded on 21 May 1917.74

The 155th Battalion, which was authorized on 22 December 1915 as the '155th "Overseas" Battalion, CEF',75 embarked for Great Britain on 17 October 1916.76 It provided reinforcements to the Canadian Corps in the field until 8 December 1916, when its personnel were absorbed by the '154th "Overseas" Battalion, CEF'.77 The battalion was disbanded on 17 July 1917.78

The 254th Battalion, which was authorized on 1 May 1917 as the '254th "Overseas" Infantry Battalion, CEF',79 embarked for Great Britain on 2 June 1917.80 Its personnel were absorbed by the '6th Reserve Battalion, CEF' on 10 June 1917 to provide reinforcements to the Canadian Corps in the field.81 The battalion was disbanded on 15 September 1917.82

The Second World War

The Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment mobilized the 'The Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment, CASF' for active service on 1 September 1939.83 It was redesignated the '1st Battalion, The Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment, CASF' on 7 November 1940.84 The unit embarked for Great Britain on 22 December 1939,85 and on 13 June 1940 it went to France as part of the Second British Expeditionary Force, reaching a point beyond Laval before being ordered back.86 It landed in Sicily on 10 July 1943, and in Italy on 3 September 1943, as part of the 1st Infantry Brigade, 1st Canadian Infantry Division.87 On 10 March 1945, the battalion moved with the 1st Canadian Corps to North West Europe, where it fought until the end of the war.88 The overseas battalion was disbanded on 15 October 1945.89

On 1 June 1945, a second Active Force component of the regiment was mobilized for service in the Pacific theatre of operations under the designation '2nd Canadian Infantry Battalion (The Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment), CASF'.90 The battalion was disbanded on 1 November 1945.91

Details from The Midland Regiment were called out on service on 26 August 1939 and then placed on active service on 1 September 1939, under the designation 'The Midland Regiment (Northumberland and Durham), CASF (Details)', for local protection duties.92 The details called out on active service were disbanded on 31 December 1940.93 The regiment subsequently mobilized 'The Midland Regiment (Northumberland and Durham), CASF' for active service on 24 May 1940.94 It was redesignated the '1st Battalion, The Midland Regiment (Northumberland and Durham), CASF' on 7 November 1940;95 It served in Canada in a home defence role as part of the Prince Rupert Defences, 8th Canadian Division.96 It embarked for Great Britain on 10 January 1945,97 where it was disbanded on 18 January 1945 to provide reinforcements to the Canadian Army in the field.98

The 34th Field Battery, in conjunction with the '32nd (Kingston) Field Battery, RCA' mobilized the '32nd/34th Field Battery, RCA, CASF' for active service on 24 May 1940.99 This unit was reorganized as two separate batteries on 1 January 1941, designated the '32nd (Kingston) Field Battery, RCA, CASF' and the '34th Field Battery, RCA, CASF'.100 On D-Day, 6 June 1944, it landed in Normandy, France, in support of the 3rd Canadian Infantry Division, and the battery provided artillery support as part of the '14th Field Regiment, RCA, CASF' in North-West Europe until the end of the war.101 The overseas battery was disbanded on 2 November 1945.102

?The battery subsequently mobilized the '2nd 34th Field Battery, RCA, CAOF' on 1 June 1945 for active service with the Canadian Army Occupation Force in Germany.103 The overseas battery was disbanded on 28 March 1946.104

REGIMENTAL COLOUR

The Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment

CAMP FLAG

The Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment


1. MGO 16 Jan 63. Formed from six newly authorized infantry companies / Formé de six compagnies d'infanterie nouvellement autorisées.

2. MGO 14/71.

3. MO 105/1900.

4. MO 59/20.

5. GO 188/36.

6. GO 273/40.

7. GO 124/05.

8. CAO 76-3, Pt 'B', Supp Issue No. 419/54.

9. GO 124/05.

10. GO 82/25.

11. GO 58/35.

12. GO 285/42.

13. GO 273/40.

14. GO 60/12.

15. GO 82/25.

16. GO 58/35.

17. GO 273/40.

18. GO 115/46.

19. MGO 6 Feb 63. Formed from six independent and one new infantry company, authorized on the following dates: 'No. 1 Company' ([1st] Volunteer Militia Infantry Company at Picton, 16 January 1863), 'No. 2 Company' ([2nd] Volunteer Militia Infantry Company at Picton, 16 January 1863), 'No. 3 Company' (Volunteer Militia Infantry Company at Wellington, 23 January 1863), 'No. 4 Company' (Volunteer Militia Infantry Company at Consecon, 23 January 1863), 'No. 5 Company' ([1st] Volunteer Militia Infantry Company at Milford, 30 January 1863), 'No. 6 Company' ([2nd] Volunteer Militia Infantry Company at Milford, 30 January 1863), and 'No. 7 Company' at Picton / Formé de six compagnies indépendantes d'infanterie et une nouvelle compagnie autorisées selon les dates suivantes : « No. 1 Company » ([1re] Volunteer Militia Infantry Company at Picton, 16 janvier 1863), « No. 2 Company » ([2e] Volunteer Militia Infantry Company at Picton, 16 janvier 1863), « No. 3 Company » (Volunteer Militia Infantry Company at Wellington, 23 janvier 1863), « No. 4 Company » (Volunteer Militia Infantry Company at Consecon, 23 janvier 1863), « No. 5 Company » ([1re] Volunteer Militia Infantry Company at Milford, 30 janvier 1863), « No. 6 Company » ([2e] Volunteer Militia Infantry Company at Milford, 30 janvier 1863) et « No. 7 Company » à Picton. 20. MGO 30 Nov 66. Although no order was issued for the redesignation, this, and subsequent orders, confirm the granting of the secondary title "Prince Edward" / Même si aucune ordonnance ne fut émise quant à la rédesignation, ceci, ainsi que les ordres subséquents confirment l'autorisation du titre secondaire de « Prince Edward ».

21. MO 115/1900.

22. MO 59/20.

23. GO 42/41.

24. GO 425/45; and/et GO 400/45.

25. MGO 30 Nov 66. Formed from three independent infantry and rifle companies, one garrison battery of artillery and two new infantry companies,authorized on the following dates: 'No. 1 Company' (The First Volunteer Militia Rifle Company of Belleville, 4 March 1858), 'No. 2 Company' (Infantry Company at Stirling, 8 June 1866), 'No. 3 Company' (Infantry Company at Sidney, 8 June 1866), 'No. 4 Company' at Madoc, 'No. 5 Company' at Tyendenaga and 'No. 6 Company' (Garrison Battery of Artillery at Trenton, 20 July 1866) / Formé de trois compagnies indépendantes d'infanterie et de voltigeurs, une batterie d'artillerie de garnison et deux nouvelles compagnies d'infanterie, autorisées selon les dates suivantes : « No. 1 Company » (The First Volunteer Militia Rifle Company of Belleville, 4 mars 1858), « No. 2 Company » (Infantry Company at Stirling, 8 juin 1866), « No. 3 Company » (Infantry Company at Sidney, 8 juin 1866), « No. 4 Company » à Madoc, « No. 5 Company » à Tyendenaga, et « No. 6 Company » (Garrison Battery of Artillery at Trenton, 20 juillet 1866).

26. MGO 9/71.

27. MO 105/1900.

28. MGO 5 Oct 66. Formed from six independent infantry and rifle companies, authorized on the following dates: 'No. 1 Company' (1st Volunteer Militia Rifle Company of Cobourg, 24 January 1856), 'No. 2 Company' (Volunteer Militia Company of Infantry at Cobourg, 6 February 1863), 'No. 3 Company' (Volunteer Militia Company of Infantry at Campbellford, 30 January 1863), 'No. 4 Company' (Infantry Company at Brighton, 20 July 1866), 'No. 5 Company' (Infantry Company at Cold Springs, 17 August 1866) and 'No. 6 Company' (Infantry Company at Grafton, 17 August 1866) / Formé de six compagnies indépendantes d'infanterie et de voltigeurs, autorisées selon les dates suivantes : « No. 1 Company » (1st Volunteer Militia Rifle Company of Cobourg, 24 janvier 1856), « No. 2 Company » (Volunteer Militia Company of Infantry at Cobourg, 6 février 1863), « No. 3 Company » (Volunteer Militia Company of Infantry at Campbellford, 30 janvier 1863), « No. 4 Company » (Infantry Company at Brighton, 20 juillet 1866), « No. 5 Company » (Infantry Company at Cold Springs, 17 août 1866), et « No. 6 Company » (Infantry Company at Grafton, 17 août 1866).

29. MO 105/1900.

30. MO 59/20.

31. GO 70/24.

32. GO 212/36.

33. GO 42/41.

34. GO 264/45.

35. GO 116/46.

36. MGO 16 Nov 66. Formed from four independent infantry and rifle companies, one garrison battery of artillery and one new infantry company, authorized on the following dates: 'No. 1 Company' (Battery Garrison Artillery at Port Hope, 8 June 1866), 'No. 2 Company' (Volunteer Militia Rifle Company at Port Hope, 22 January 1862), 'No. 3 Company' (Volunteer Militia Company of Infantry at Port Hope, 17 October 1862), 'No. 4 Company' (Volunteer Militia Company of Infantry at Millbrook, 16 January 1863), 'No. 5 Company' (Infantry Company at Springville, 17 August 1866) and 'No. 6 Company' at Lifford / Formé de quatre compagnies indépendantes d'infanterie et de voltigeurs, une batterie d'artillerie de garnison et une nouvelle compagnie d'infanterie, autorisées selon les dates suivantes : « No. 1 Company » (Battery Garrison Artillery at Port Hope, 8 juin 1866), « No. 2 Company » (Volunteer Militia Rifle Company at Port Hope, 22 janvier 1862), « No. 3 Company » (Volunteer Militia Company of Infantry at Port Hope, 17 octobre 1862), « No. 4 Company » (Volunteer Militia Company of Infantry at Millbrook, 16 janvier 1863), « No. 5 Company » (Infantry Company at Springville, 17 août 1866), et « No. 6 Company » à Lifford.

37. MGO 79/97.

38. MO 105/1900.

39. MO 59/20.

40. MGO 8 Mar 66.

41. MGO 26 Mar 66.

42. MGO 8/85.

43. General Sir Frederick Middleton, Suppression of the Rebellion in the North West Territories of Canada 1885, (Toronto, 1948), p. 42.

44. MGO 16/85.

45. MGO 8/85.

46. General Sir Frederick Middleton, Suppression of the Rebellion in the North West Territories of Canada 1885, (Toronto, 1948), p. 42.

47. MGO 16/85.

48. MGO 8/85.

49. General Sir Frederick Middleton, Suppression of the Rebellion in the North West Territories of Canada 1885, (Toronto, 1948), p. 42.

50. MGO 16/85.

51. MGO 8/85.

52. General Sir Frederick Middleton, Suppression of the Rebellion in the North West Territories of Canada 1885, (Toronto, 1948), p. 42.

53. MGO 16/85.

54. List of Canadian Artillery units during the First World War. Compiled from ledger of C.E.F. Units (Mr. Pye) for Col. Nicholson, Sep 63, Kardex file 112.3H1.005 (D4).

55. CEF Sailing List, vol. XII.

56. War Diary/Journaux de guerre, 9th Brigade, Canadian Field Artillery, NAC/AN, RG9/GE 9, Series III-D-3, Vol. 4970, File/dossier 548.

57. G.W.L. Nicholson, The Gunners of Canada. The History of the Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery, vol. 1 (Toronto, 1967), passim.

58. GO 191/20. Although this formation is not specifically listed, this is considered the official disbandment date as it is the date in which all the batteries of the brigade were disbanded / Même si cette formation n'est pas spécifiquement listée, l'on considère cette date comme étant celle de sa dissolution officielle puisqu'elle correspond à celle de toutes les batteries des brigades d'artillerie.

59. GO 86/15.

60. CEF Sailing List, vol. II.

61. Edwin Pye Papers, Summary of History of C.E.F. Units - 39th Battalion, Document Collection/Collection de documents 74/672, Series/séries I, Box/boîte11, Folder/chemise 39.

62. GO 82/18.

63. GO 103a/15.

64. CEF Sailing List, vol. IV.

65. Edwin Pye Papers, Summary of History of C.E.F. Units - 80th Battalion, Document Collection/Collection de documents 74/672, Series/séries VI, Box/boîte 12, Folder/chemise 80.

66. GO 82/18.

67. GO 151/15.

68. CEF Sailing List, vol. VII.

69. Edwin Pye Papers, Summary of History of C.E.F. Units - 136th Battalion, Document Collection/Collection de documents 74/672, Series/séries VI, Box/boîte 12, Folder/chemise 136.

70. GO 63/17.

71. GO 151/15.

72. CEF Sailing List, vol. VII.

73. Edwin Pye Papers, Summary of History of C.E.F. Units - 139th Battalion, Document Collection/Collection de documents 74/672, Series/séries VI, Box/boîte 12, Folder/chemise 139.

74. GO 63/17.

75. GO 151/15.

76. CEF Sailing List, vol. VIII.

77. Edwin Pye Papers, Summary of History of C.E.F. Units - 155th Battalion, Document Collection/Collection de documents 74/672, Series/séries VI, Box/boîte 13, Folder/chemise 155.

78. GO 82/18.

79. GO 48/17.

80. CEF Sailing List, vol. XI.

81. Edwin Pye Papers, Summary of History of C.E.F. Units - 254th Battalion, Document Collection/Collection de documents 74/672, Series/séries VI, Box/boîte 13, Folder/chemise 254.

82. GO 82/18.

83. GO 135/39.

84. GO 42/41.

85. Document Collection/Collection de documents 92/252, (3-6-16)The Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment, Box/boîte 35, Folder/chemise 15.

86. Ibid; and/et Farley Mowat, The Regiment (Toronto, 1955), pp. 28-35.

87. Ibid; and/et G.W.L. Nicholson, Official History of the Canadian Army in the Second World War, Volume II. The Canadians in Italy, 1943-1945 (Ottawa, 1957), passim.

88. Ibid; and/et Colonel C.P. Stacey, The Victory Campaign: The Operations in North-West Europe 1944-1945, (Ottawa, 1966), passim.

89. GO 85/46.

90. GO 241/45. The Canadian units formed for the Pacific theatre of operations were organized and equipped the same as the American army. The battalion was part of the '1st Canadian Infantry Regiment' / Les unités canadiennes du théâtre des opérations du Pacifique furent organisées et équipées de la même façon que l'Armée américaine. Le bataillon servit en tant que composante du « 1st Canadian Infantry Regiment ».

91. GO 425/45.

92. GO 124/39; and/et GO 135/39.

93. GO 44/41.

94. GO 184/40; and/et GO 50/41.

95. GO 42/41.

96. Colonel C.P. Stacey, Official History of the Canadian Army in the Second World War, Volume 1, Six Years of War (Ottawa, 1955), p. 539.

97. Document Collection/Collection de documents 92/252, (3-6-16)The Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment, Box/boîte 35, Folder/chemise 15.

98. GO 114/45.

99. GO 184/40; and/et GO 50/41.

100. GO 45/41.

101. Document Collection/Collection de documents 92/252, (3-6-16)The Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment, Box/boîte 35, Folder/chemise 15.

102. GO 52/46.

103. GO 319/45.

104. GO 162/46.

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