Volume 3, Part 2: Infantry Regiments

THE PRINCESS LOUISE FUSILIERS

The Princess Louise Fusiliers Badge

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BADGE

Description

A grenade Sable issuant therefrom a flame of nineteen points proper charged with the coronet of a daughter of the Sovereign Or encircled by an annulus Gules edged, charged in base with two maple leaves and inscribed PRINCESS LOUISE FUSILIERS in letters Or.

Symbolism

The coronet of H.R.H. The Princess Louise refers to the regiment's name. The grenade alludes to the original role of fusiliers, who were soldiers specially equipped to escort artillery trains. The red and white of the flames are the livery colours of the regiment and the official colours of Canada. "PRINCESS LOUISE FUSILIERS" is a form of the regimental title, and the maple leaves represent service to Canada.

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MOTTO

FIDELITER (Faithfully)

MARCH

"British Grenadiers"

ALLIANCE

British Army

The Royal Irish Regiment

BATTLE HONOURS

North West Rebellion

NORTH WEST CANADA, 1885.

South African War

SOUTH AFRICA, 1899-1900.

The First World War

SOMME, 1916; ARRAS, 1917; HILL 70; YPRES, 1917; AMIENS.

The Second World War

LIRI VALLEY; Melfa Crossing; GOTHIC LINE; CORIANO; LAMONE CROSSING; Misano Ridge; ITALY, 1944-1945; Arnhem, 1945; Delfzijl Pocket; NORTH-WEST EUROPE, 1945.

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LINEAGE

This Reserve Force regiment originated on 18 June 1869 and incorporates the following regiment and machine gun battalion.

The Princess Louise Fusiliers originated in Halifax, Nova Scotia on 18 June 1869, when 'The Halifax Volunteer Battalion of Infantry' was authorized to be formed.1 It was redesignated: '66th The Halifax Volunteer Battalion of Infantry' on 5 November 1869;2 '66th Battalion, "Princess Louise Fusiliers"' on 14 November 1879;3 '66th Regiment "Princess Louise Fusiliers"' on 8 May 1900;4 and 'The Princess Louise Fusiliers' on 15 May 1920.5 On 1 December 1936, it was amalgamated with the 'Headquarters' and 'A' Company' of the '6th Machine Gun Battalion, CMGC' (see below) and redesignated 'The Princess Louise Fusiliers (Machine Gun)'.6 It was redesignated: '2nd (Reserve) Battalion, The Princess Louise Fusiliers (Machine Gun)' on 1 January 1941;7 'The Princess Louise Fusiliers (Machine Gun)' on 15 February 1946;8 'The Princess Louise Fusiliers' on 11 April 1958;9 'The Princess Louise's Fusiliers' on 14 May 1985;10 and 'The Princess Louise Fusiliers' on 5 January 2009.11

Notes:

Upon redesignation as The Princess Louise Fusiliers on 15 May 1920 (see above), it was organized as a two battalion regiment with the 1st Battalion (64th Battalion, CEF) on the Non Permanent Active Militia order of battle and the 2nd Battalion (no CEF designation) on the Reserve order of battle. The reserve unit was disbanded on 14 December 1936 (GO 3/37).

The Princess Louise Fusiliers were disbanded for the purpose of reorganization on 15 September 1920 and reorganized the same day (GO 232/20). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment.

The Princess Louise Fusiliers were disbanded for the purpose of amalgamation on 30 November 1936 and reorganized the next day (GO 180/36). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment.

On 22 December 1964, The Princess Louise Fusiliers and The Halifax Rifles (RCAC) were ordered to effect an amalgamation as an infantry battalion under a "to be determined" designation by 31 March 1965 (SD 1 Letter No. 64/68). This amalgamation was cancelled through Amendment 1 to SD Letter No. 64/68 (EASCOM Msg G 5631 of 22 Sep 65).

The '6th Machine Gun Battalion, CMGC' originated in Halifax, Nova Scotia on 1 June 1919, when the '6th Machine Gun Brigade, CMGC' was authorized to be formed.12 It was redesignated the '6th Machine Gun Battalion, CMGC' on 15 September 1924.13 On 1 December 1936, it was amalgamated with 'The Princess Louise Fusiliers', as above.

Notes:

The 6th Machine Gun Brigade, CMGC was authorized a Reserve order of battle counterpart on 1 June 1919 (GO 104/20). The reserve unit was disbanded on 14 December 1936 (GO 3/37).

The 6th Machine Gun Battalion, CMGC was disbanded for the purpose of amalgamation on 30 November 1936 and reorganized the next day (GO 180/36). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment.

On 1 December 1936, 'The King's Canadian Hussars', now the '88th Field Battery, RCA' transferred to the Supplementary Order of Battle, amalgamated with '"B" Company, 6th Machine Gun Battalion, CMGC' and '"C" Company, 6th Machine Gun Battalion, CMGC' was amalgamated with 'The North Nova Scotia Highlanders', now 'The Nova Scotia Highlanders' (GO 180/36). The perpetuation of the 6th Machine Gun Battalion, CMGC (1919-1936) was assigned to The Princess Louise Fusiliers (Machine Gun) (GO 76/37).

Perpetuations

'64th "Overseas" Battalion, CEF'

Headquarters Location

Halifax, Nova Scotia

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OPERATIONAL HISTORY

North West Rebellion

The 66th Battalion, "Princess Louise Fusiliers" mobilized three companies for active service on 10 April 1885.14 The companies served with the 'Halifax Provisional Battalion' in the Alberta Column of the North-West Field Force.15 The companies were removed from active service on 24 July 1885.16

South African War

The 66th Battalion, "Princess Louise Fusiliers" contributed volunteers for the Canadian Contingents during the South African War.17

The First World War

The 66th Regiment "Princess Louise Fusiliers" was placed on active service on 6 August 1914 for local protection duties.18

The 64th Battalion, which was authorized on 20 April 1915 as the '64th "Overseas" Battalion, CEF',19 embarked for Great Britain on 31 March 1916.20 The battalion provided reinforcements to the Canadian Corps in the field until 7 July 1916 when it ceased to function.21 On 7 December 1916, it was reorganized,22 and on 8 January 1917 it absorbed the '37th Overage Battalion, CEF'.23 The battalion was disbanded on 27 July 1917.24

The Second World War

Details from the regiment were called out on service on 26 August 1939 and then placed on active service on 1 September 1939, under the designation 'The Princess Louise Fusiliers (Machine Gun), CASF (Details)', for local protection duties.25 The details called out on active service were disbanded on 31 December 1940.26

The regiment subsequently mobilized the '1st Battalion, The Princess Louise Fusiliers (Machine Gun), CASF' for active service on 1 January 1941.27 It was redesignated: 'The Princess Louise Fusiliers (Motor), CASF' on 26 January 1942;28 '1st Battalion, The Princess Louise Fusiliers, CIC, CASF' on 31 January 1943;29 '11th Infantry Brigade Support Group (The Princess Louise Fusiliers), CIC, CASF' on 12 August 1943;30 and '11th Independent Machine Gun Company (The Princess Louise Fusiliers), CASF' on 1 July 1944.31 The battalion embarked for Great Britain on 26 October 1942.32 The machine gun company landed in Italy on 10 November 1943, as part of the 11th Infantry Brigade, 5th Canadian Armoured Division.33 On 13 July 1944, the '12th Independent Machine Gun Company (The Princess Louise Fusiliers), CIC, CASF' was organized in Italy to serve with the newly formed 12th Infantry Brigade, 5th Canadian Armoured Division.34 In February 1945, both companies moved with the 1st Canadian Corps to North-West Europe,35 where the 12th Independent Machine Gun Company was disbanded on 15 March 1945, and the 11th Independent Machine Gun Company fought until the end of the war.36 The overseas company was disbanded on 15 February 1946.37

REGIMENTAL COLOUR

The Princess Louise Fusiliers

CAMP FLAG

The Princess Louise Fusiliers


1. MGO 18 June 69. Formed from six newly authorized infantry companies / Formé de six compagnies d'infanterie nouvellement autorisées.

2. MGO 5 Nov 69.

3. MGO 27/79.

4. MO 105/1900.

5. GO 42/20; and/et GO 77/20.

6. GO 180/36.

7. GO 42/41; and/et GO 213/43.

8. GO 400/45.

9. CAO 76-3, Pt 'B', Supp Issue No. 596/58.

10. MOO 163/85, 14 May 85 / DMO 163/85, 14 mai 85, also/aussi MOO 92251, 4 Sep 92 / DMO 92251, 4 sep 92; and/et MOO 97175, 14 Aug 97 / DMO 97175, 14 août 97.

11. MOO/DMO 2008042.

12. GO 47/19; and/et GO 1/20.

13. GO 117/24.

14. MGO 8/85.

15. General Sir Frederick Middleton, Suppression of the Rebellion in the North West Territories of Canada 1885, (Toronto, 1948), p. 42.

16. MGO 16/85.

17. GO 60/33.

18. GO 142/14.

19. GO 103a/15.

20. CEF Sailing List, vol. IV.

21. CTDO 3485/16; and CTDO 3666/16.

22. CTDO 6316/16; and/et CTDO 432/17.

23. CRO 265/17.

24. GO 89/17.

25. GO 124/39; and/et GO 135/39.

26. GO 44/41.

27. GO 44/41; and/et GO 42/41.

28. GO 132/42.

29. GO 21/44.

30. GO 21/44.

31. GO 120/45.

32. Document Collection 92/252, (3-6-32) The Princess Louise Fusiliers (MG), Box/boîte 36, Folder/chemise 16.

33. Ibid.

34. GO 17/45; and/et G.W.L. Nicholson, Official History of the Canadian Army in the Second World War, Volume II. The Canadians in Italy, 1943- 1945, (Ottawa, 1957), passim.

35. Document Collection 92/252, (3-6-32) The Princess Louise Fusiliers (MG), Box/boîte 36, Folder/chemise 16.

36. GO 253/45; and/et Charles P. Stacey, Official History of the Canadian Army. The Victory Campaign, (Ottawa, 1966), p. 593.

37. GO 111/46.

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