Volume 3, Part 2: Infantry Regiments

THE ROYAL NEW BRUNSWICK REGIMENT

Royal New Brunswick Regiment Badge

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Colonel-in-Chief: Her Majesty The Queen

BADGE

Description

Argent the Arms of the Province of New Brunswick (Or a lymphad proper on a base barry wavy Azure and Argent, on a chief Gules a lion passant guardant Or) environed by a scroll Gules edged and inscribed ROYAL NEW BRUNSWICK REGIMENT in letters Or ensigned by the Royal Crown proper and surmounted at the base by a like scroll inscribed SPEM REDUXIT.

Symbolism

The Crown represents service to the Sovereign, while the shield from the Arms of the Province New Brunswick refers to the regiment's home in that province. "ROYAL NEW BRUNSWICK REGIMENT" is a form of the regimental title and "SPEM REDUXIT" is the motto of the regiment and of the province.

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MOTTO

SPEM REDUXIT (Hope restored)

MARCH

"A Hundred Pipers"

ALLIANCES

British Army

The Royal Regiment of Scotland; The Princess of Wales's Royal Regiment; and The Yorkshire Regiment

BATTLE HONOURS

The War of 1812

DEFENCE OF CANADA – 1812-1815 – DÉFENSE DU CANADA; NIAGARA (both awarded in commemoration of the New Brunswick Fencible Infantry (104th Regiment of Foot))

Honorary Distinction

The non-emblazonable honorary distinction DEFENCE OF CANADA – 1812-1815 – DÉFENSE DU CANADA
(partly awarded in commemoration of the New Brunswick Fencibles)

South African War

SOUTH AFRICA, 1899-1900, 1902.

The First World War

YPRES, 1915, '17; FESTUBERT, 1915; MOUNT SORREL; SOMME, 1916, '18; Flers-Courcelette; Thiepval; Ancre Heights; Ancre, 1916; ARRAS, 1917, '18; Vimy, 1917; Arleux; Scarpe, 1917, '18; HILL 70; Passchendaele; AMIENS; Drocourt Quéant; HINDENBURG LINE; Canal du Nord; Cambrai, 1918; VALENCIENNES; FRANCE AND FLANDERS, 1915-18.

The Second World War

LANDING IN SICILY;Valguarnera; SICILY, 1943; Landing at Reggio; Gambatesa; THE SANGRO; The Gully; Point 59; CASSINO II; Gustav Line; LIRI VALLEY; Hitler Line; Melfa Crossing; GOTHIC LINE; LAMONE CROSSING; RIMINI LINE; San Fortunato; Naviglio Canal; ITALY, 1943-1945; FALAISE; Falaise Road; The Laison; Chambois; The Seine, 1944; Moerbrugge; Moerkerke; THE SCHELDT;Breskens Pocket; The Lower Maas; Kapelsche Veer; THE RHINELAND; THE RHINE; Apeldoorn; Küsten Canal; Bad Zwischenahn; NORTH WEST EUROPE, 1944-1945.

Note:
Two of the units which were amalgamated to form this regiment (The Saint John Fusiliers and The York Regiment) possessed the battle honour PURSUIT TO MONS from the First World War, but this honour cannot be perpetuated if a regiment is entitled to the honour VALENCIENNES or SAMBRE. One of these honours was gained by the regiment upon the amalgamations.

LINEAGE

This Reserve Force regiment originated on 10 September 1869 and incorporates the following regiments.

The Royal New Brunswick Regiment originated in Woodstock, New Brunswick on 10 September 1869, when 'The Carleton Light Infantry' was authorized to be formed.1 It was redesignated: '67th The Carleton Light Infantry' on 5 November 1869;2 '67th Regiment "Carleton Light Infantry"' on 8 May 1900;3 and 'The Carleton Light Infantry' on 15 March 1920.4 On 15 December 1936, it was amalgamated with 'The York Regiment' (see below) and redesignated 'The Carleton and York Regiment'.5 It was redesignated: '2nd (Reserve) Battalion, The Carleton and York Regiment' on 7 November 1940;6 and 'The Carleton and York Regiment' on 1 November 1945.7 On 31 October 1954, it was amalgamated with 'The New Brunswick Scottish' (see below) and redesignated the '1st Battalion, The New Brunswick Regiment (Carleton and York)'.8 On 18 May 1956, the regiment was redesignated 'The Royal New Brunswick Regiment'.9 on 7 June 2012 the 2nd Battalion was organized as a separate regiment and redesignated ‘The North Shore (New Brunswick) Regiment’.10

Notes:
Upon redesignation as The Carleton Light Infantry on 15 March 1920 (see above), it was organized as a two battalion regiment with the 1st Battalion (44th Battalion, CEF) on the Non Permanent Active Militia order of battle, and the 2nd Battalion (104th Battalion, CEF) on the Reserve order of battle. The reserve unit was disbanded on 14 December 1936 (GO 3/37).

The Carleton Light Infantry was disbanded for the purpose of reorganization on 1 June 1920 and reorganized the same day (GO 139/20). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment.

The Carleton Light Infantry was disbanded for the purpose of amalgamation on 14 December 1936 and reorganized the next day (GO 206/36). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment

On 4 May 1951, The Carleton and York Regiment mobilized two temporary Active Force companies designated "E" and "F" Company (CAO 110-2, Pt 'B', Supp Issue No. 245/51; and SD 1 Letter No. 4237, 5 May 1951). "E" Company was reduced to nil strength upon its personnel being incorporated into the '1st Canadian Infantry Battalion' for service in Germany with the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (SD 1 Letter No. 4365, 12 November 1951). It was disbanded on 29 July 1953 ( CAO 78-2, Pt 'B', Supp Issue No. 352/53). "F" Company was initially used as a reinforcement pool for "E" Company. On 15 May 1952, it was reduced to nil strength, upon its personnel being absorbed by the newly formed '2nd Canadian Infantry Battalion' for service in Korea with the United Nations (SD 1 Letter No. 4452, 22 April 1952; and CAO 110-2, Pt 'B', Supp Issue No. 283/52). "F" Company was disbanded on 29 July 1953 (CAO 78-2, Pt 'B', Supp Issue No. 352/53).

The perpetuation of the 44th "Overseas" Battalion, CEF was transferred from the regiment (originally allocated to The Carleton Light Infantry) to The Royal Winnipeg Rifles on 11 September 1969 (CFSO 351/69, 3 Oct 69).

Upon redesignation as The New Brunswick Regiment on 31 October 1954 (see above), it was organized as a two battalion regiment. The 1st Battalion was designated '1st Battalion, The New Brunswick Regiment (Carleton and York)' and the 2nd Battalion the '2nd Battalion, The New Brunswick Regiment (North Shore)'.

On 12 August 1977, all generic titles in the Canadian Forces, such as 'battalion', were made bilingual (Memorandum, DGBB (Director General Bilingualism and Biculturalism), 1901-1/1211-7-4, 12 Aug 77).

'The York Regiment' originated in Fredericton, New Brunswick on 10 September 1869, when 'The York Provisional Volunteer Battalion' was authorized to be formed.11 It was redesignated: '71st "York" Volunteer Battalion' on 12 November 1869;12 '71st York Regiment' on 8 May 1900;13 and 'The York Regiment' on 15 March 1920.13 On 15 December 1936 it was amalgamated with 'The Carleton Light Infantry', as above.

Notes:
Upon redesignation as The York Regiment on 15 March 1920 (see above), it was organized as a two battalion regiment with the 1st Battalion (12th Battalion, CEF) on the Non Permanent Active Militia order of battle, and the 2nd Battalion (140th Battalion, CEF) on the Reserve order of battle. The reserve unit was disbanded on 14 December 1936 (GO 3/37).

The York Regiment was disbanded for the purpose of reorganization on 15 September 1920 and reorganized the same day (GO 232/20). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment.

The York Regiment was disbanded for the purpose of amalgamation on 14 December 1936 and reorganized the next day (GO 206/36). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment.

The New Brunswick Scottish originated in Sussex, New Brunswick on 12 August 1870, when the '74th Battalion of Infantry' was authorized to be formed.14 It was redesignated: '74th Regiment' on 8 May 1900;15 '74th Regiment "The Brunswick Rangers"' on 2 November 1903;16 'The New Brunswick Rangers' on 15 March 1920;17 '2nd (Reserve) Battalion, The New Brunswick Rangers' on 1 January 1941;18 and 'The New Brunswick Rangers' on 15 February 1946.19 On 31 August 1946, it was amalgamated with 'The Saint John Fusiliers (Machine Gun)' (see below) and redesignated 'The South New Brunswick Regiment'.20 It was redesignated 'The New Brunswick Scottish' on 2 December 1946.21a On 31 October 1954, it was amalgamated with 'The Carleton and York Regiment' and redesignated the '1st Battalion, The New Brunswick Regiment (Carleton and York), as above.

Notes:
Upon redesignation as The New Brunswick Rangers on 15 March 1920 (see above), it was organized as a three battalion regiment with the 1st Battalion (55th Battalion, CEF) on the Non Permanent Active Militia order of battle, and the 2nd Battalion (145th Battalion, CEF) and 3rd Battalion (236th Battalion, CEF) on the Reserve order of battle. The reserve units were disbanded on 14 December 1936 (GO 3/37).

The New Brunswick Rangers were disbanded for the purpose of reorganization on 15 September 1920 and reorganized the same day (GO 253/20). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment.

The Saint John Fusiliers originated in Saint John, New Brunswick on 22 March 1872, when the '62nd "St. John" Battalion of Infantry' was authorized to be formed.23 It was redesignated: '62nd Battalion "Saint John Fusiliers"' on 14 April 1882;24 '62nd Regiment "St. John Fusiliers"' on 8 May 1900;25 'The St. John Fusiliers' on 15 March 1920;26 and 'The Saint John Fusiliers' on 2 September 1925.27 On 15 December 1936, it was amalgamated with the 'Headquarters' and 'Headquarters Squadron' of 'The New Brunswick Dragoons' (see below) and 'A Company' of the '7th Machine Gun Battalion, CMGC' (see below) and redesignated 'The Saint John Fusiliers (Machine Gun)'.28 It was redesignated: '2nd (Reserve) Battalion, The Saint John Fusiliers (Machine Gun)' on 1 January 1941;29 and 'The Saint John Fusiliers (Machine Gun)' on 1 June 1945.30 On 31 August 1946, it was amalgamated with 'The New Brunswick Rangers', as above.

Notes:
No lineal connection with the '62nd The St. John Volunteer Battalion, N.B.' of 1869 to 1871.

On 1 December 1898, the independent 'St. John Rifle Company' was amalgamated with the 62nd Battalion "Saint John Fusiliers" to form an additional infantry company (GO 115/95). This unit originated in Saint John, New Brunswick on 8 July 1862, when a "Western Militia District Engineer Company" was authorized to be formed (New Brunswick MO 8 Jul 62). It was redesignated: 'The St. John Engineer Company' on 6 February 1869 (Militia List 1870; and MGO 30 April 69); 'The New Brunswick Engineers Company' on 28 May 1869 (MGO 28 May 69); and converted to infantry and redesignated the 'St. John Rifle Company' on 13 January 1882 (MGO 1/82).

The St. John Fusiliers were disbanded for the purpose of reorganization on 10 January 1920 and reorganized the same day (GO 54/20, GO 253/20, and GO 118/21). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment.

Upon redesignation as The St. John Fusiliers on 15 March 1920 (see above), it was organized as a two battalion regiment with the 1st Battalion (26th Battalion, CEF) on the Non Permanent Active Militia order of battle, and the 2nd Battalion (115th Battalion, CEF) on the Reserve order of battle. The reserve unit was disbanded on 14 December 1936 (GO 3/37).

The Saint John Fusiliers were disbanded for the purpose of amalgamation on 14 December 1936 and reorganized the next day (GO 191/36). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment.

The New Brunswick Dragoons originated in Saint John, New Brunswick on 2 March 1911, when the '28th "New Brunswick" Dragoons' were authorized to be formed.31 It was redesignated 'The New Brunswick Dragoons' on 15 March 1920.32 On 15 December 1936, it was amalgamated with 'The Saint John Fusiliers', as above.

Notes:
The New Brunswick Dragoons were disbanded for the purpose of reorganization on 15 July 1920 and reorganized the same day (GO 172/20). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment.

On 1 November 1920, The New Brunswick Dragoons were organized as a two regiment unit with the 1st Regiment on the Non Permanent Active Militia order of battle, and the 2nd Regiment on the Reserve order of battle (GO 185/20). The reserve unit was disbanded on 14 December 1936 (GO 3/37).

The New Brunswick Dragoons were disbanded for the purpose of amalgamation on 14 December 1936 and reorganized the next day (GO 191/36). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment.

The '7th Machine Gun Battalion, CMGC' originated in Saint John, New Brunswick on 1 June 1919, when the '7th Machine Gun Brigade, CMGC' was authorized to be formed.33 It was redesignated the '7th Machine Gun Battalion, CMGC' on 15 September 1924.34 On 15 December 1936, it was amalgamated with 'The Saint John Fusiliers', as above.

Notes:
The 7th Machine Gun Brigade, CMGC was authorized a Reserve order of battle counterpart on 1 June 1919 (GO 104/20). The reserve unit was disbanded on 14 December 1936 (GO 3/37).

The 7th Machine Gun Battalion, CMGC was disbanded for the purpose of reorganization and amalgamation on 14 December 1936 and reorganized the next day. 'Headquarters' and 'B Company' were redesignated 'The New Brunswick Regiment (Tank) (disbanded as the '64th Light Anti-Aircraft Regiment (New Brunswick Regiment), RCA' in 1959). 'A Company' was amalgamated as above. 'C Company' was amalgamated with other sub-units and redesignated the '104th Field Battery, RCA' (reduced to nil strength and transferred to the Supplementary Order of Battle in 1966 (GO 188/36; and GO 191/36).

The perpetuation of the 7th Machine Gun Battalion, CMGC (1919- 1936) was assigned to The Saint John Fusiliers (Machine Gun) (GO 76/37).

Perpetuations

‘1st, 2nd, and 3rd Battalions, Northumberland County Regiment (1812-15)’, ‘1st Battalion, Saint John County Regiment (1812-15)’, ‘1st and 2nd Battalions, York County Regiment (1812-15)', '12th', '26th', '55th', '104th', 115th, '132nd', 140th', '145th', and '236th "Overseas" Battalion(s), CEF'

Headquarters Location

Fredericton, New Brunswick

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OPERATIONAL HISTORY

South African War

The '62nd Regiment "St. John Fusiliers"' contributed volunteers for the Canadian Contingents during the South African War.35

The '71st York Regiment' contributed volunteers for the Canadian Contingents during the South African War.36

The First World War

Details of the 67th Regiment "Carleton Light Infantry" were placed on active service on 6 August 1914 for local protective duty.37

Details of the 62nd Regiment St. John Fusiliers" were placed on active service on 6 August 1914 for local protective duty.38

Details of the 71st York Regiment were placed on active service on 6 August 1914 for local protective duty.39

Details of the 74th Regiment "The Brunswick Rangers" were placed on active service on 6 August 1914 for local protective duty.40

The 12th Battalion, which was authorized on 10 August 1914 as the '12th Battalion, CEF',41 embarked for Britain on 30 September 1914.42 It was redesignated '12th Reserve Infantry Battalion, CEF' on 29 April 1915, to provide reinforcements for the Canadian Corps in the field.43 The battalion was disbanded on 30 August 1920.44

The 26th Battalion, which was authorized on 7 November 1914 as the '26th Battalion, CEF',45 embarked for Britain on 15 June 1915.46 It disembarked in France on 16 September,47 where it fought as part of the 5th Infantry Brigade, 2nd Canadian Division in France and Flanders until the end of the war.48 The battalion was disbanded on 30 August 1920.49

The 55th Battalion, which was authorized on 7 November 1914 as the '55th Battalion, CEF',50 embarked for Britain on 30 October 1915.51 It provided reinforcements for the Canadian Corps in the field until 6 July 1916, when its personnel were absorbed by the '40th "Overseas" Battalion, CEF'.52 The battalion was disbanded on 21 May 1917.53

The 104th Battalion, which was authorized on 22 December 1915 as the '104th "Overseas" Battalion, CEF',54 embarked for Britain on 28 June 1916.55 It provided reinforcements for the Canadian Corps in the field until 24 January 1917, when its personnel were absorbed by the '105th "Overseas" Battalion, CEF'.56 The battalion was disbanded on 27 July 1918.57

The 115th Battalion, which was authorized on 22 December 1915 as the '115th "Overseas" Battalion, CEF',58 embarked for Britain on 23 July 1916.59 It provided reinforcements for the Canadian Corps in the field until 21 October 1916, when its personnel were absorbed by the '112th "Overseas" Battalion, CEF'.60 The battalion was disbanded on 1 September 1917.61

The 140th Battalion, which was authorized on 22 December 1915 as the '140th "Overseas" Battalion, CEF',62 embarked for Britain on 25 September 1916.63 On 2 November 1916, its personnel were absorbed by the depots of 'The Royal Canadian Regiment, CEF' and 'Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry, CEF' to provide reinforcements for the Canadian Corps in the field.64 The battalion was disbanded on 27 July 1918.65

The 145th Battalion, which was authorized on 22 December 1915 as the '145th "Overseas" Battalion, CEF',66 embarked for Britain on 25 September 1916.67 On 7 October 1916, its personnel were absorbed by the '9th Reserve Battalion, CEF' to provide reinforcements for the Canadian Corps in the field.68 The battalion was disbanded on 17 July 1917.69

The 236th Battalion, which was authorized on 15 July 1916 as the '236th "Overseas" Battalion, CEF',70 embarked for Britain on 30 October and 9 November 1917.71 It provided reinforcements for the Canadian Corps in the field until 13 March 1918, when its personnel were absorbed by the '20th Reserve Battalion, CEF'.72 The battalion was disbanded on 30 August 1920.73

The Second World War

The Carleton and York Regiment mobilized the 'The Carleton and York Regiment, CASF' for active service on 1 September 1939.74 It was redesignated the '1st Battalion, The Carleton and York Regiment, CASF' on 7 November 1940.75 It embarked for Britain on 9 December 1939.76 The battalion landed in Sicily on 10 July 1943 and in Italy on 3 September 1943 as part of the 3rd Infantry Brigade, 1st Canadian Infantry Division.77 On 16 March 1945, it moved to North-West Europe, where it fought until the end of the war.78 The overseas battalion was disbanded on 30 September 1945.79

On 1 June 1945, a second Active Force component of the regiment was mobilized for service in the Pacific theatre of operations, under the designation '2nd Canadian Infantry Battalion, (The Carleton and York Regiment), CASF'.80 The battalion was disbanded on 1 November 1945.81

Details of The North Shore (New Brunswick) Regiment were called out on service on 26 August 1939 and then placed on active service on 1 September 1939, under the designation 'The North Shore (New Brunswick) Regiment, CASF (Details)', for local protection duties.82 The details called out on active service were disbanded on 31 December 1940.83

The regiment subsequently mobilized the '1st Battalion, The New Brunswick Rangers, CASF' for active service on 1 January 1941.84 It was redesignated: 'The 10th Canadian Infantry Brigade Support Group (The New Brunswick Rangers), CIC, CASF' on 1 November 1943;85 and 'The 10th Independent Machine Gun Company (The New Brunswick Rangers), CIC, CASF' on 24 February 1944.86 The unit served in Labrador in a home defence role as part of Atlantic Command from June 1942 to July 1943.87 It embarked for Britain on 13 September 1943.88 On 26 July 1944, the company landed in France as part of the 10th Infantry Brigade, 4th Canadian Armoured Division, and it continued to fight in North-West Europe until the end of the war.89 The overseas company was disbanded on 15 February 1946.90

Details of The Saint John Fusiliers (Machine Gun) were called out on service on 26 August 1939 and then placed on active service on 1 September 1939, under the designation 'The Saint John Fusiliers (Machine Gun), CASF (Details)', for local protection duties.91 The details called out on active service were disbanded on 31 December 1940.92

The regiment subsequently mobilized the '1st Battalion, The Saint John Fusiliers (Machine Gun), CASF' for active service on 1 January 1941.93 It served in Canada in a home defence role as part of the 18th Infantry Brigade, 6th Canadian Division,94 and "C" Company of this unit took part in the expedition to Kiska, Alaska as a component of the 13th Canadian Infantry Brigade Group, serving there from 16 August 1943 to 6 January 1944.95 It embarked for Britain on 2 January 1945.96 The overseas battalion was disbanded on 10 January 1945.97

REGIMENTAL COLOUR

Royal New Brunswick Regiment

CAMP FLAG

Royal New Brunswick Regiment


1. MGO 10 Sep 69. Formed from five newly authorized infantry companies / Formé de cinq compagnies d'infanterie nouvellement autorisées.

2. MGO 5 Nov 69.

3. MO 105/1900.

4. GO 28/20.

5. GO 206/36.

6. GO 42/41.

7. GO 425/45; and et GO 400/45.

8. CAO 76-3, Pt 'B', Supp Issue No. 415/54.

9. CAO 268-4, Pt 'A', Supp Issue No. 497/56.

10. MOO / AMO 2012001

11. GO 10 Sep 69. Formed from three existing independent infantry and rifle companies and one new company, authorized on the following dates: 'No. 1 Company' (Rifle Company (Victoria Rifles) at Fredericton, 10 December 1861), 'No. 2 Company' (Infantry Company at St. Mary's, 28 May 1869), 'No. 3 Company' (Infantry Company at McKeen's Corner, 16 July 1869) and the newly authorized 'No. 4 Company' / Formé de trois compagnies indépendantes d'infanterie et de voltigeurs et une nouvelle compagnie, autorisées selon les dates suivantes : « No. 1 Company » (Rifle Company (Victoria Rifles) at Fredericton, 10 décembre 1861), « No. 2 Company » (Infantry Company at St. Mary's, 28 mai 1869), « No. 3 Company » (Infantry Company at McKeen's Corner, 16 juillet 1869) et la nouvellement autorisée « No. 4 Company ».

12. MGO 12 Nov 69.

13. MO 105/1900.

14. GO 28/20.

15. MGO 24/70. Formed from six existing independent infantry companies, authorized on the following dates: 'No. 1 Company' (Infantry Company at Kingston, 30 April 1869), 'No. 2 Company' (Infantry Company at Elgin, 2 July 1869), 'No. 3 Company' (Infantry Company at Sussex, 10 September 1869), 'No. 4 Company' (Infantry Company at Shemogue, 5 March 1869), 'No. 5 Company' (Infantry Company at Sackville, 16 July 1869) and 'No. 6 Company' (Infantry Company at Bay Verte, 10 September 1869) / Formé de six compagnies indépendantes d'infanterie, autorisées selon les dates suivantes : « No. 1 Company » (Infantry Company at Kingston, 30 avril 1869), « No. 2 Company » (Infantry Company at Elgin, 2 juillet 1869), « No. 3 Company » (Infantry Company at Sussex, 10 septembre 1869), « No. 4 Company » (Infantry Company at Shemogue, 5 mars 1869), « No. 5 Company » (Infantry Company at Sackville, 16 juillet 1869) et « No. 6 Company » (Infantry Company at Bay Verte, 10 septembre 1869).

16. MO 105/1900.

17. GO 170/03.

18. GO 28/20.

19. GO 42/41; and/et GO 44/41.

20. GO 400/45; and/et GO 111/46.

21. GO 115/46; and/et CAO 76-3, Supp Issue No. 26/47.

22. GO 290/46.

23. MGO 7/72. Formed from six existing independent infantry companies, authorized on the following dates: 'No. 1 Company' (Havelock Rifles, 14 March 1860), 'No. 2 Company' (The Queen's Own Rifles, 21 March 1860), 'No. 3 Company' (City Guards, St. John, 27 June 1860), 'No. 4 Company' (St. John Rifles, 4 July 1860), 'No. 5 Company' (Royals, 23 October 1861), and 'No. 6 Company' (No. 6 Infantry Company, St. John, 14 March 1866) / Formé de six compagnies indépendantes d'infanterie, autorisées selon les dates suivantes : « No. 1 Company » (Havelock Rifles, 14 mars 1860), « No. 2 Company » (The Queens Own Rifles, 21 mars 1860), « No. 3 Company » (City Guards, St. John, 27 juin 1860), « No. 4 Company » (St. John Rifles, 4 juillet 1860), « No. 5 Company » (Royals, 23 octobre 1861), et « No. 6 Company » (No. 6 Infantry Company, St. John, 14 mars 1866).

24. GO 7/82.

25. MO 105/1900.

26. GO 28/20.

27. MO 463/25.

28. GO 191/36.

29. GO 42/41; and/et GO 44/41.

30. GO 264/45.

31. GO 34/11.

32. GO 26/20.

33. GO 47/19; and/et GO 1/20.

34. GO 117/24.

35. GO 60/33.

36. Ibid.

37. GO 146/14. The unit also contributed to the 'Halifax Composite Battalion' which was organized for local protective duty / L'unité contribua également à la mise sur pied du « Bataillon composite d'Halifax » organisé pour le devoir de protection locale.

38. GO 163/14.

39. Ibid. The unit also contributed to the 'Halifax Composite Battalion' which was organized for local protective duty / L'unité contribua également à la mise sur pied du « Bataillon composite d'Halifax » organisé pour le devoir de protection locale.

40. GO 163/14.

41. PC 2067, 6 August 1914, and/et memorandum Preliminary Instructions for Mobn. War 1914, BGen V.A.S. Williams, Adjutant-General, Canadian Militia to O.Cs. Divisions and Districts, 10 August 1914, reprinted in Colonel A.F. Duguid, Official History of the Canadian Forces in the Great War, 1914-1919, vol. 1 - Appendices (Ottawa), 1938), pp. 37-39.

42. Ibid., pp. 112 and/et 116.

43. Edwin Pye Papers, Summary of History of C.E.F. Units - 12th Battalion, Document Collection/Collection de documents 74/672, Series/séries IV, Box/boîte 11, Folder/chemise 12; and/et Shorncliffe Camp Order 450/15.

44. GO 149/20.

45. GO 36/15.

46. CEF Sailing List, vol. II.

47. War Diary/Journaux de guerre, 26th Canadian Infantry Battalion, LAC/BAC, RG/GE 9, Series III-D-3, Vol. 4934, File/dossier 420.

48. G.W.L. Nicholson, Official History of the Canadian Army in the First World War, Canadian Expeditionary Force 1914-1919 (Ottawa, 1962), passim.

49. GO 149/20.

50. GO 86/15.

51. CEF Sailing List, vol. III. The unit also sent a reinforcing draft overseas on 19 June 1915 / L'unité envoya également un contingent de renforts outre-mer le 19 juin 1915.

52. Edwin Pye Papers, Summary of History of C.E.F. Units - 55th Battalion, Document Collection/Collection de documents 74/672, Series/séries VI, Box/boîte 12, Folder/chemise 55.

53. GO 63/17.

54. GO 151/15.

55. CEF Sailing List, vol. VI.

56. Edwin Pye Papers, Summary of History of C.E.F. Units - 104th Battalion, Document Collection/Collection de documents 74/672, Series/séries VI, Box/boîte 12, Folder/chemise 104.

57. GO 101/18.

58. GO 151/15.

59. CEF Sailing List, vol. VI.

60. Edwin Pye Papers, Summary of History of C.E.F. Units - 115th Battalion, Document Collection/Collection de documents 74/672, Series/séries VI, Box/boîte 12, Folder/chemise 115.

61. GO 82/18.

62. GO 151/15.

63. CEF Sailing List, vol. VII.

64. Edwin Pye Papers, Summary of History of C.E.F. Units - 140th Battalion, Document Collection/Collection de documents 74/672, Series/séries VI, Box/boîte 12, Folder/chemise 140.

65. GO 101/18.

66. GO 151/15.

67. CEF Sailing List, vol. VIII.

68. Edwin Pye Papers, Summary of History of C.E.F. Units - 145th Battalion, Document Collection/Collection de documents 74/672, Series/séries VI, Box/boîte 13, Folder/chemise 145.

69. GO 82/18.

70. GO 69/16.

71. Edwin Pye Papers, Summary of History of C.E.F. Units - 236th Battalion, Document Collection/Collection de documents 74/672, Series/séries VI, Box/boîte 13, Folder/chemise 236.

72. Ibid.

73. GO 149/20.

74. GO 135/39.

75. GO 42/41.

76. Robert Tooley, Invicta: The Carleton and York Regiment in the Second World War, (Fredericton, 1989), pp. 38 and/et 39.

77. Ibid, passim; and/et G.W.L. Nicholson, Official History of the Canadian Army in the Second World War, Volume II. The Canadians in Italy, 1943-1945, (Ottawa, 1957), passim.

78. Robert Tooley, Invicta: The Carleton and York Regiment in the Second World War, (Fredericton, 1989), p. 340.

79. GO 85/46.

80. GO 241/45. The Canadian units formed for the Pacific theatre of operations were organized and equipped the same as the American army. The battalion was part of the '3rd Canadian Infantry Regiment' / Les unités canadiennes du théâtre des opérations du Pacifique furent organisées et équipées de la même façon que l'Armée américaine. Le bataillon servit en tant que composante du « 3rd Canadian Infantry Regiment ».

81. GO 425/45.

82. GO 124/39; and/et GO 135/39.

83. GO 44/41.

84. GO 44/41; and/et GO 42/41.

85. GO 21/44.

86. GO 222/44.

87. Colonel C.P. Stacey, Official History of the Canadian Army in the Second World War, Volume 1, Six Years of War (Ottawa, 1955), p. 536; and/et War Diary/Journaux de guerre, The New Brunswick Rangers, LAC/BAC, RG/GE 24, Series C-3, Vol. 6624.

88. Document Collection/Collection de documents 92/252, (3-6-49) The Royal New Brunswick Regiment, Box/boîte 37, Folder/chemise 14.

89. Ibid; and/et Colonel C.P. Stacey, The Victory Campaign: The Operations in North-West Europe 1944-1945, (Ottawa, 1966), passim.

90. GO 111/46.

91. GO 124/39; and/et GO 135/39.

92. GO 44/41.

93. GO 44/41; and/et GO 42/41.

94. Colonel C.P. Stacey, Official History of the Canadian Army in the Second World War, Volume 1, Six Years of War (Ottawa, 1955), p. 538.

95. Ibid, pp. 502-505. Upon landing, the Japanese were found to have previously evacuated the island / Lors du débarquement, l'on découvrit que les Japonais avaient déjà quitté l'île.

96. Document Collection/Collection de documents 92/252, (3-6-49) The Royal New Brunswick Regiment, Box/boîte 37, Folder/chemise 14.

97. GO 114/45.

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