Volume 3, Part 2: Infantry Regiments

THE ROYAL WINNIPEG RIFLES

The Royal Winnipeg Rifles

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Colonel-in-Chief: His Royal Highness The Prince Charles Prince of Wales KG KT GCB OM AK QSO GCL SOM CD ADC

BADGE

Description

Gules a devil courant grasping in the dexter hand a trident Sable and in the sinister a chalice his feet resting on a scroll Argent inscribed HOSTIUM ACIE NOMINATI in letters Sable all within an annulus Vert fimbriated and inscribed ROYAL WINNIPEG RIFLES in letters Argent surmounting a cross pattée Sable fimbriated and pommé Argent below a plaque Vert fimbriated and inscribed with the battle honours FISH CREEK / BATOCHE in letters Argent and ensigned by the Royal Crown proper, the whole within a wreath of maple leaves Argent enwrapped by a scroll Vert fimbriated and inscribed with battle honours in letters Argent: dexter YPRES, 1915,'17 / MOUNT SORREL; VIMY, 1917 / PASSCHENDAELE; DROCOURT- QUEANT / NORMANDY LANDING; CARPIQUET / CALAIS, 1944; LEOPOLD CANAL / THE RHINE; and sinister FESTUBERT, 1915 / SOMME, 1916; HILL 70 / AMIENS; CANAL DU NORD / PUTOT-EN-BESSIN; FALAISE / THE SCHELDT; MOYLAND WOOD / N.W. EUROPE, 1944-45, and at the base of the wreath NORTH WEST CANADA, 1885 / SOUTH AFRICA, 1899-1900.

Symbolism

The wreath of maple leaves represent service to Canada, and the crown, service to the Sovereign. The Maltese cross, which is based on the insignia of the Royal Guelphic Order, is common among badges of rifle regiments. The black devil carrying a trident and offering a chalice preserves the legend that during the North-West Rebellion the soldiers were referred to by the opposing forces as "little black devils" because of their almost black (dark rifle green) uniforms. Hence, the adoption of the regiment's motto "HOSTI ACIE NOMINATI", which means "named by the enemy force". "FISH CREEK", "BATOCHE", "YPRES, 1915,'17", "MOUNT SORREL", "VIMY, 1917", "PASSCHENDAELE", "DROCOURT-QUEANT", "NORMANDY LANDING", "CARPIQUET", "CALAIS, 1944", "LEOPOLD CANAL", "THE RHINE", "FESTUBERT, 1915", "SOMME, 1916", "HILL 70", "AMIENS", "CANAL DU NORD", "PUTOT-EN- BESSIN", "FALAISE", "THE SCHELDT", "MOYLAND WOOD", "N.W. EUROPE, 1944-45", "NORTH WEST CANADA, 1885" and "SOUTH AFRICA, 1899-1900" are regimental battle honours. "ROYAL WINNIPEG RIFLES" is a form of the regimental title.

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MOTTO

HOSTI ACIE NOMINATI

Note:

For many years, the regiment used HOSTI ACIE NOMINATI, a grammatically incorrect version of the motto.

MARCHES

Quick March

"Old Solomon Levi" also published under the title "Pork, Beans and Hard Tack"

Double Past

"Keel Row"

ALLIANCE

British Army

The Rifles

BATTLE HONOURS

North West Rebellion

FISH CREEK; BATOCHE; NORTH WEST CANADA, 1885.

South African War

SOUTH AFRICA, 1899-1900.

The First World War

YPRES, 1915, '17; Gravenstafel; St. Julien; FESTUBERT, 1915; MOUNT SORREL; SOMME, 1916, '18; Flers-Courcelette; Thiepval; Ancre Heights; Ancre, 1916; ARRAS, 1917, '18; Vimy, 1917; Arleux; HILL 70; Passchendaele; AMIENS; Scarpe, 1917, '18; Drocourt-Quéant; HINDENBURG LINE; Canal du Nord; Cambrai, 1918; VALENCIENNES; FRANCE AND FLANDERS, 1915-18.

Honorary Distinction

Oak leaf shoulder badge for the actions of the 10th Battalion, CEF, at Kitchener's Wood on 22/23 April 1915.

Note:

The regiment is entitled, through perpetuations of CEF units, to the battle honour PURSUIT TO MONS, but this honour cannot be perpetuated when a regiment already holds either VALENCIENNES or SAMBRE. The regiment is entitled to the honour VALENCIENNES through the perpetuation of the 44th Battalion, CEF.

The Second World War

NORMANDY LANDING; Putot-en-Bessin; CAEN; Carpiquet; The Orne; BOURGUÉBUS RIDGE; FALAISE; The Laison; The Seine, 1944; Calais, 1944; THE SCHELDT; Leopold Canal; Breskens Pocket; THE RHINELAND; Waal Flats; Moyland Wood; THE RHINE; Emmerich-Hoch Elten; Deventer; NORTH-WEST EUROPE, 1944-1945.

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LINEAGE

This Reserve Force regiment originated on 9 November 1883 and incorporates the following regiments.

The Royal Winnipeg Rifles originated in Winnipeg, Manitoba on 9 November 1883, when the '90th "Winnipeg" Battalion of Rifles' was authorized to be formed.1 It was redesignated: '90th Regiment "Winnipeg Rifles"' on 8 May 1900;2 'The Winnipeg Rifles' on 12 March 1920;3 'The Royal Winnipeg Rifles' on 3 June 1935;4 '2nd (Reserve) Battalion, The Royal Winnipeg Rifles' on 7 November 1940;5 and 'The Royal Winnipeg Rifles' on 28 March 1946.6 On 30 June 1955, it was amalgamated with 'The Winnipeg Light Infantry' (see below), retaining its designation.7

Notes:

Upon redesignation as The Winnipeg Rifles on 12 March 1920 (see above), it was organized as a five battalion regiment with the 1st Battalion (8th Battalion, CEF) on the Non Permanent Active Militia order of battle, and the 2nd Battalion (90th Battalion, CEF), 3rd Battalion (144th Battalion, CEF), 4th Battalion (190th Battalion, CEF), and 5th Battalion (203rd Battalion, CEF) on the Reserve order of battle. The reserve units were disbanded on 14 December 1936 (GO 3/37).

The Winnipeg Rifles were disbanded for the purpose of reorganization on 15 September 1920 and reorganized the same day (GO 204/20). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment.

On 4 May 1951, the regiment mobilized two temporary Active Force companies designated "E" and "F" (CAO 110-2, Pt 'B', Supp Issue No. 245/51 and SD 1 Letter No. 4237, 5 May 1951). "E" Company was reduced to nil strength upon its personnel being incorporated into the '1st Canadian Rifle Battalion' for service in Germany with the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (SD 1 Letter No. 4365, 12 November 1951). It was disbanded on 29 July 1953 (CAO 78-2, Pt 'B', Supp Issue No. 352/53). "F" Company was initially used as a reinforcement pool for "E" Company. On 15 May 1952, it was reduced to nil strength, upon its personnel being absorbed by the newly formed '2nd Canadian Rifle Battalion' for service in Korea with the United Nations (SD 1 Letter No. 4452, 22 April 1952 and CAO 110-2, Pt 'B', Supp Issue No. 283/52). "F" Company was disbanded on 29 July 1953 (CAO 78-2, Pt 'B', Supp Issue No. 352/53).

On 11 September 1969, the perpetuation of the 44th Battalion, CEF was transferred to The Royal Winnipeg Rifles from The Royal New Brunswick Regiment (CFSO 351/69).

On 19 October 1999, the perpetuation of the 27th Battalion, CEF was transferred to The Royal Winnipeg Rifles from 'The Manitoba Regiment' (disbanded 1 February 1936) (NDHQ 5400-34 (DHH Heritage Offr), 13 Oct 99).

The Winnipeg Light Infantry originated in Winnipeg, Manitoba on 1 April 1912, when the '106th Regiment, Winnipeg Light Infantry' was authorized to be formed.8 It was redesignated: 'The Winnipeg Light Infantry' on 12 March 1920;9 'The Winnipeg Light Infantry (Machine Gun)' on 15 December 1936;10 '2nd (Reserve) Battalion, The Winnipeg Light Infantry (Machine Gun)' on 18 March 1942;11 'The Winnipeg Light Infantry (Machine Gun)' on 1 June 1945;12 and 'The Winnipeg Light Infantry' on 1 April 1946.13 On 30 June 1955, it was amalgamated with 'The Royal Winnipeg Rifles', as above.

Notes:

Upon redesignation as The Winnipeg Light Infantry on 12 March 1920 (see above), it was organized as a five battalion regiment with the 1st Battalion (10th Battalion, CEF) on the Non Permanent Active Militia order of battle, and the 2nd Battalion (61st Battalion, CEF), 3rd Battalion (101st Battalion, CEF), 4th Battalion (222nd Battalion, CEF), and 5th Battalion (226th Battalion, CEF) on the Reserve order of battle. The reserve units were disbanded on 14 December 1936 (GO 3/37).

The Winnipeg Light Infantry was disbanded for the purpose of reorganization on 15 September 1920 and reorganized the same day (GO 204/20). This change was administrative and does not affect the lineage of the regiment.

On 16 March 1932, the regiment was authorized to perpetuate the '91st Winnipeg Battalion of Light Infantry' (GO 38/32).

Perpetuations

'91st "Winnipeg" Battalion of Light Infantry' of 1885-1888; and '8th', '10th', '27th', '44th', '61st', '90th', '101st', '144th', '190th', '203rd', '222nd' and '226th "Overseas" Battalion(s), CEF'

Headquarters Location

Winnipeg, Manitoba

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OPERATIONAL HISTORY

North West Rebellion

The 90th "Winnipeg" Battalion of Rifles was mobilized for active service on 10 April 1885.14 It served as part of Middleton's Column of the North West Field Force.15 The battalion was removed from active service on 18 September 1885.16

The 91st "Winnipeg" Battalion of Light Infantry was mobilized for active service on 10 April 1885, when "a Battalion at Winnipeg" was authorized to be formed.17 It was redesignated the 'Winnipeg Light Infantry Battalion' on 15 May 1885.18 The battalion served in the Alberta Column of the North West Field Force.19 It was removed from active service on 18 September 1885, and retained on the Non- Permanent Active Militia order of battle.20

Note:

The battalion was redesignated the '91st "Winnipeg" Battalion of Light Infantry' on 2 April 1886 (MGO 7/86), and disbanded on 23 November 1888 (MGO 18/88).

South African War

The 90th "Winnipeg" Battalion of Rifles contributed volunteers to the Canadian Contingents during the South African War.21

The First World War

Details of the 90th Regiment "Winnipeg Rifles" were placed on active service on 6 August 1914 for local protection duties.22

Details of the 106th Regiment, Winnipeg Light Infantry were placed on active service on 6 August 1914 for local protection duties.23

The 8th Battalion, which was authorized on 10 August 1914 as the '8th Battalion, CEF',24 embarked for Great Britain on 1 October 1914.25 It disembarked in France on 13 February 1915, where it fought as part of the 2nd Infantry Brigade, 1st Canadian Division in France and Flanders until the end of the war.26 The battalion was disbanded on 15 September 1920.27

The 10th Battalion, which was authorized on 10 August 1914 as the '10th Battalion, CEF',28 embarked for Great Britain on 29 September 1914.29 It disembarked in France on 14 February 1915, where it fought as part of the 2nd Infantry Brigade, 1st Canadian Division in France and Flanders until the end of the war.30 The battalion was disbanded on 15 September 1920.31

The 27th Battalion, which was authorized on 7 November 1914 as the '27th Battalion, CEF',32 embarked for Great Britain on 17 May 1915.33 It disembarked in France on 18 September 1915, where it fought as part of the 6th Infantry Brigade, 2nd Canadian Division in France and Flanders until the end of the war.34 The battalion was disbanded on 15 September 1920.35

The 44th Battalion, which was authorized on 7 November 1914 as the '44th Battalion, CEF',36 embarked for Great Britain on 23 October 1915.37 It disembarked in France on 12 August 1916, where it fought as part of the 10th Infantry Brigade, 4th Canadian Division in France and Flanders until the end of the war.38 The battalion was disbanded on 15 September 1920.39

The 61st Battalion, which was authorized on 20 April 1915 as the '61st "Overseas" Battalion, CEF',40 embarked for Great Britain on 5 April 1915.41 It provided reinforcements to the Canadian Corps in the field until 7 July 1916, when its personnel were absorbed by the '11th Reserve Battalion, CEF'.42 The battalion was disbanded on 17 July 1917.43

The 90th Battalion, which was authorized on 22 December 1915 as the '90th "Overseas" Battalion, CEF',44 embarked for Great Britain on 31 May 1916.45 Its personnel were absorbed by the '11th Reserve Battalion, CEF' on 19 July 1916 to provide reinforcements to the Canadian Corps in the field.46 The battalion was disbanded on 1 September 1917.47

The 101st Battalion, which was authorized on 22 December 1915 as the '101st "Overseas" Battalion, CEF',48 embarked for Great Britain on 29 June 1916.49 Its personnel were absorbed by the '17th Reserve Battalion, CEF' on 13 July 1916 to provide reinforcements to the Canadian Corps in the field.50 The battalion was disbanded on 12 October 1917.51

The 144th Battalion, which was authorized on 22 December 1915 as the '144th "Overseas" Battalion, CEF',52 embarked for Great Britain on 18 September 1916.53 It provided reinforcements to the Canadian Corps in the field until 12 January 1917, when its personnel were absorbed by the '18th Reserve Battalion, CEF'.54 The battalion was disbanded on 17 July 1917.55

The 190th Battalion, which was authorized on 15 July 1916 as the '190th "Overseas" Battalion, CEF',56 embarked for Great Britain on 3 May 1917.57 Its personnel were absorbed by the '18th Reserve Battalion, CEF' on 14 May 1917 to provide reinforcements to the Canadian Corps in the field.58 The battalion was disbanded on 1 September 1917.59

The 203rd Battalion, which was authorized on 15 July 1916 as the '203rd "Overseas" Battalion, CEF',60 embarked for Great Britain on 26 October 1916.61 It provided reinforcements to the Canadian Corps in the field until 2 January 1917, when its personnel were absorbed by the '18th Reserve Battalion, CEF'.62 The battalion was disbanded on 15 September 1917.63

The 222nd Battalion, which was authorized on 15 July 1916 as the '222nd "Overseas" Battalion, CEF',64 embarked for Great Britain on 15 November 1916.65 It provided reinforcements to the Canadian Corps in the field until 2 January 1917, when its personnel were absorbed by the '19th Reserve Battalion, CEF'.66 The battalion was disbanded on 1 September 1917.67

The 226th Battalion, which was authorized on 15 July 1916 as the '226th "Overseas" Battalion, CEF',68 embarked for Great Britain on 16 December 1916.69 It provided reinforcements to the Canadian Corps in the field until 7 April 1917, when its personnel were absorbed by the '14th Reserve Battalion, CEF'.70 The battalion was disbanded on 27 July 1917.71

The Second World War

The Royal Winnipeg Rifles mobilized 'The Royal Winnipeg Rifles, CASF' for active service on 24 May 1940.72 It was redesignated the '1st Battalion, The Royal Winnipeg Rifles, CASF' on 7 November 1940.73 It embarked for Great Britain on 28 August 1941.74 On D-Day, 6 June 1944, it landed in Normandy, France as part of the 7th Infantry Brigade, 3rd Canadian Infantry Division, and it continued to fight in North-West Europe until the end of the war.75 The overseas battalion was disbanded on 15 January 1946.76

The regiment subsequently mobilized the '3rd Battalion, The Royal Winnipeg Rifles, CASF' for active service on 12 May 1942.77 It served in Canada in a home defence role as part of the 20th Infantry Brigade, 7th Canadian Division.78 The battalion was disbanded on 15 August 1943.79

On 1 June 1945, a third Active Force component of the regiment, designated '4th Battalion, The Royal Winnipeg Rifles, CIC, CAOF', was mobilized for service with the Canadian Army Occupation Force in Germany.80 The battalion was disbanded on 28 March 1946.81

Details of The Winnipeg Light Infantry (Machine Gun) were called out on service on 26 August 1939 and then placed on active service on 1 September 1939, under the designation 'The Winnipeg Light Infantry (Machine Gun), CASF (Details)', for local protection duties.82 The details called out on active service were disbanded on 31 December 1940.83 Details of the regiment were again called out on service on 1 January 1941, under the designation 'Details of 1st (Reserve) Battalion, The Winnipeg Light Infantry (Machine Gun)',84 but they were disbanded the same day.85 The regiment subsequently mobilized the '1st Battalion, The Winnipeg Light Infantry, CASF' for active service on 18 March 1942.86 It served in Canada in a home defence role as part of the 19th Infantry Brigade and 14th Infantry Brigade.87 On 3 January 1945, it embarked for Great Britain,88 where it was disbanded on 10 January 1945 to provided reinforcements to the Canadian Army in the field.89

REGIMENTAL COLOUR

Rifle regiments do not carry Colours. They may emblazon their battle honours on unit appointments such as cap badges.

CAMP FLAG

The Royal Winnipeg Rifles


1. MGO 23/83. Formed from one independent infantry company authorized on 20 September 1878 as the 'Winnipeg Infantry Company', and five newly authorized rifle companies / Formé d'une compagnie indépendante d'infanterie autorisée le 20 septembre 1878 sous l'appellation de « Winnipeg Infantry Company », /et de cinq compagnies de voltigeurs nouvellement autorisées.

2. MO 105/1900.

3. MO 60/20.

4. GO 58/35.

5. GO 42/41.

6. GO 400/45; and/et GO 162/46.

7. CAO 76-3, Pt 'B', Supp Issue No. 435/55; and/et CAO 76-3, Pt 'B', Supp Issue No. 451/55.

8. GO 60/12.

9. MO 60/20.

10. GO 192/36.

11. GO 42/41.

12. GO 439/44; and/et GO 264/45.

13. GO 115/46.

14. MGO 8/85.

15. General Sir Frederick Middleton, Suppression of the Rebellion in the North West Territories of Canada 1885, (Toronto, 1948), pp. 29 and/et 30.

16. MGO 21/85. This order incorrectly refers to the battalion as the '90th "Winnipeg" Battalion of Infantry' / Cette ordonnance fait incorrectement référence à ce bataillon en tant que « '90th "Winnipeg" Battalion of Infantry ».

17. MGO 8/85.

18. MGO 10/85.

19. General Sir Frederick Middleton, Suppression of the Rebellion in the North West Territories of Canada 1885, (Toronto, 1948), p. 42.

20. MGO 21/85.

21. GO 60/33.

22. GO 146/14.

23. Ibid.

24. PC 2067, 6 August 1914; and/et memorandum Preliminary Instructions for Mobn. War 1914, BGen V.A.S. Williams, Adjutant-General, Canadian Militia to O.Cs. Divisions and Districts, 10 August 1914, reprinted in Colonel A.F. Duguid, Official History of the Canadian Forces in the Great War, 1914-1919, vol. 1 - Appendices and Maps (Ottawa, 1938), pp. 37-39.

25. Ibid., pp. 112 and/et 116.

26. War Diary/Journaux de guerre, 8th Canadian Infantry Battalion, LAC/BAC, RG/GE 9, Series III-D-3, Vol. 4918, File/dossier 369.

27. GO 149/20.

28. PC 2067, 6 August 1914; and/et memorandum Preliminary Instructions for Mobn. War 1914, BGen V.A.S. Williams, Adjutant-General, Canadian Militia to O.Cs. Divisions and Districts, 10 August 1914, reprinted in Colonel A.F. Duguid, Official History of the Canadian Forces in the Great War, 1914-1919, vol. 1 - Appendices and Maps (Ottawa, 1938), pp. 37-39.

29. Ibid., pp. 111 and/et 116.

30. War Diary/Journaux de guerre, 10th Canadian Infantry Battalion, LAC/BAC, RG/GE 9, Series III-D-3, Vol. 4919, File/dossier 372; and/et Daniel G. Dancocks, Gallant Canadians : The Story of the Tenth Canadian Infantry Battalion, 1914-1919, (Markham, 1990), passim.

31. GO 149/20.

32. GO 36/15.

33. CEF Sailing List, vol. II.

34. War Diary/Journaux de guerre, 27th Canadian Infantry Battalion, LAC/BAC, RG/GE 9, Series III-D-3, Vol. 4934, File/dossier 422.

35. GO 149/20.

36. GO 86/15.

37. CEF Sailing List, vol. III. The unit also sent two reinforcing drafts overseas on 1 June and 4 September 1915 / L'unité envoya également deux contingents de renforts outre-mer les 1er juin et 4 septembre 1915.

38. War Diary/Journaux de guerre, 44th Canadian Infantry Battalion, LAC/BAC, RG/GE 9, Series III-D-3, Vol. 4939, File/dossier 435; and/et E.S. Russenholdt, Six Thousand Canadian Men: Being the History of The 44th Battalion Canadian Infantry 1914-1919, (Winnipeg, 1932), passim.

39. GO 149/20.

40. GO 103a/15.

41. CEF Sailing List, vol. IV. The unit also sent a reinforcing draft overseas on 11 September 1915 / L'unité envoya également un contingent de renforts outre-mer le 11 septembre 1915.

42. Edwin Pye Papers, Summary of History of C.E.F. Units - 61st Battalion, Document Collection/Collection de documents 74/672, Series/séries IV, Box/boîte 12, Folder/chemise 61.

43. GO 82/18.

44. GO 151/15.

45. CEF Sailing List, vol. V. The unit also sent a reinforcing draft overseas on 27 August 1915 / L'unité envoya également un contingent de renforts outre-mer le 27 août 1915.

46. Edwin Pye Papers, Summary of History of C.E.F. Units - 90th Battalion, Document Collection/Collection de documents 74/672, Series/séries IV, Box/boîte 12, Folder/chemise 90.

47. GO 82/18.

48. GO 151/15.

49. CEF Sailing List, vol. VI.

50. Edwin Pye Papers, Summary of History of C.E.F. Units - 101st Battalion, Document Collection/Collection de documents 74/672, Series/séries IV, Box/boîte 12, Folder/chemise 101.

51. GO 82/18.

52. GO 151/15.

53. CEF Sailing List, vol. VIII.

54. Edwin Pye Papers, Summary of History of C.E.F. Units - 144th Battalion, Document Collection/Collection de documents 74/672, Series/séries IV, Box/boîte 13, Folder/chemise 144.

55. GO 82/18.

56. GO 69/16.

57. CEF Sailing List, vol. IX.

58. Edwin Pye Papers, Summary of History of C.E.F. Units - 190th Battalion, Document Collection/Collection de documents 74/672, Series/séries IV, Box/boîte 13, Folder/chemise 190.

59. GO 82/18.

60. GO 69/16.

61. CEF Sailing List, vol. X.

62. Edwin Pye Papers, Summary of History of C.E.F. Units - 203rd Battalion, Document Collection/Collection de documents 74/672, Series/séries IV, Box/boîte 13, Folder/chemise 203.

63. GO 82/18.

64. GO 69/16.

65. CEF Sailing List, vol. X.

66. Edwin Pye Papers, Summary of History of C.E.F. Units - 222nd Battalion, Document Collection/Collection de documents 74/672, Series/séries IV, Box/boîte 13, Folder/chemise 222.

67. GO 82/18.

68. GO 69/16.

69. CEF Sailing List, vol. X.

70. Edwin Pye Papers, Summary of History of C.E.F. Units - 226th Battalion, Document Collection/Collection de documents 74/672, Series/séries IV, Box/boîte 13, Folder/chemise 226.

71. GO 89/17.

72. GO 184/40; and/et GO 50/41.

73. GO 42/41.

74. Bruce Tascona and Eric Wells, Little Black Devils: A History of the Royal Winnipeg Rifles (Winnipeg, 1983), p. 139.

75. Ibid, passim; and/et Document Collection 92/252, (3-6-53)The Royal Winnipeg Rifles, Box/boîte 37, Folder/chemise 18.

76. GO 85/46.

77. GO 309/42.

78. Colonel C.P. Stacey, Official History of the Canadian Army in the Second World War, Volume 1, Six Years of War (Ottawa, 1955), p. 537.

79. GO 438/43.

80. GO 319/45.

81. GO 162/46.

82. GO 124/39; and/et GO 135/39.

83. GO 44/41.

84. GO 44/41; GO 42/41; and/et GO 125/39.

85. GO 337/43.

86. GO 147/42.

87. Colonel C.P. Stacey, Official History of the Canadian Army in the Second World War, Volume 1, Six Years of War (Ottawa, 1955), p. 538.

88. Document Collection 92/252, (3-6-65)The Winnipeg Light Infantry, Box/boîte 38, Folder/chemise 10.

89. GO 114/45.

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